Handwoven Scarves Embellished with Flair

You could say I finished these scarves too late. Winter in Texas has come and gone. But I prefer to think of it as considerably early. When cool weather comes back around in a few months, I’ll be ready. I began with the draft for the lovely Stardust scarf, designed by Mona Nielsen, published in Happy Weaving, from VävMagasinet, p.74. I simply substituted the yarn and colors in the book with what I had on hand.

New warp on warping reel for winter scarves.
Warp is mostly 6/2 Tuna wool, with some 7.5/2 Brage wool included.
Stripes on the back beam. What a lovely sight!
Made with yarn on hand. This means that additional stripes have been added to the plan.
Weaving by the fire in the middle of winter.
Weaving by the fire in the middle of winter. Mora 20/2, a fine wool, is used for weft.
Two new wool scarves coming off the loom!
Two scarves coming off the loom.
Fringe twisting.
Fringes are cut and twisted.

The scarves are delightful, but the icing on the cake is the addition of fluffy, furry pompoms, an embellishment with youthful flair. And that is exactly what I will put on at the first sign of autumn chill.

Making pompoms to embellish the handwoven scarf.
Some of the thrums are used in making pompoms.
With the Pom and Tassel Maker by Red Heart I can make seven pompoms at a time.
With the Pom and Tassel Maker by Red Heart I can make seven pompoms at a time. I wrapped the yarn around 100 times, making full and thick pompoms.
Each furry ball is shaped and trimmed.
Each furry ball is shaped and trimmed. I used 8/2 cotton for the 12″ tie around the center of the pompoms.
Adding pompom embellishments to the scarf.
Each pompom is stitched to 3 – 4 twisted fringes. Seven pompoms at each end of the scarf.
Handwoven scarves with pompoms!
Now, the scarves are ready for wet finishing. Notice how you can see the separate strands of yarn in the pompoms before they are washed.
Handwoven scarves with pompoms, hanging to dry.
Scarves have been washed by hand in warm water in a large sink, with Eucalan delicate wash. I purposely gave them as much agitation as I could by hand. They are hanging to dry. Notice how the pompoms have slightly felted, making them even more soft and furry.
Winter scarf amid spring bluebonnets in Texas hill country.
Winter scarf amid spring bluebonnets in Texas hill country.

Some things are certain. The sun will rise tomorrow. The seasons will follow their schedule. The faithfulness of the Lord our God will never end.

May you dress in youthful flair.

Warmly,
Karen

25 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    Very pretty! I love the pompoms!

    Take care!!

  • Charlotte says:

    So, so, so precious! And! Your scarf is pretty special, as well!!!

  • Marianne says:

    It’s gorgeous! What a clever way to add Pom poms!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marianne, Thank you so much! The idea for the pompoms came from the book Happy Weaving. That’s what drew me to this scarf pattern.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie Lancaster says:

    Hi, Karen!

    I love the colors and pattern of this scarf. And the pom poms are the perfect touch. Thank you telling us how they were made and attached. I always learn from you.

    Please stay safe and healthy.

    Annie

  • Janet says:

    Love the addition of Pom Poms. I haven’t used tuna wool before but recently purchased many skeins for a throw. I know you’ve used quite often, what do you find the best sett for a lovely drape for a twill structure?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Janet, My favorite twill blanket from Tuna wool is the one I made at Vävstuga. You can see the info for the project here: Swedish Wool Blanket.
      Tuna wool is an excellent choice for a throw. I think you will enjoy weaving with it, too!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Elisabeth says:

    What a beautiful and “happy” scarf I have never seen this pom pom maker before, a neat tool, thank you for showing us!
    Elisabeth

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, I happened upon the pompom maker while browsing at Hobby Lobby. I knew I wanted this embellishment for my scarves, so I was happy to find a helpful tool. It beats cutting out cardboard circles to wrap with yarn–one fluff ball at a time. It wouldn’t be hard to make a similar tool at home.

      I, too, think of this as a “happy” scarf.

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Betsy says:

    Such a fun scarf!

  • Nannette says:

    Hi Karen,
    What a pretty scarf. With the early Spring in Wisconsin, it is too warm to wear it here until November. More time for anticipation.

    My looms were taken to the retirement home Friday. The chipper was brought back so my sister can dispatch the 5 mature trees she dropped.

    Now I am going through my sewing room. Oh My, Why did I buy some of the things I am finding? Three piles. Donate, Sell, Take with me. Too many decisions. Where did I get all those cards of snaps from 1960?

    Are any of your readers in health care? I am wondering if the cloth face masks being shown as projects are something that can be used in the medical system, or are they just fashion statements? When the other grandchildren were born I would take a home made treat to leave with the nurses. This year I could leave some cheerful cloth masks…

    This latest grandson can come at any time.

    Blessings to all.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, Congratulations on your coming grandson. Life is full of twists and turns. I’m glad you have a place for looms in your new home. That gives you something to look forward to.

      Blessings to you,
      Karen

  • Betty Morrissey says:

    Beautiful! May I ask, when weaving with a stretchy wool warp, do you tension it tightly so the stretch is maxed out?
    The pom poms are a great use of ends. Thank you for your kindness, always.

    Betty

    • Karen says:

      Hi Betty, Great question! No, I don’t tension tightly to max out the stretch of the wool. I don’t want to over-stretch the wool. You have to find a happy medium so that it is tight enough that the shuttle doesn’t fall through, but not so tight that it will stretch the fibers out too far.

      I’m always happy when I can find a good use for some of the thrums. Who knows, maybe I’ll start putting pompoms on everything. 🙂

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Jan says:

    These are gorgeous. I am so inspired by your weaving and sharing.
    Thank you

  • Barbara Mitchell says:

    Love these scarves and the pom-poms. I tried to put pom-poms on a scarf, but couldn’t get them tightly enough tied on to the end of the twisted fringe so they just ended up looking goofy and wishy-washy, so I cut them off again. Do you have a secret?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Barbara, Thanks for asking! I think what helps is stitching the pom pom to a group of 3 or 4 twisted fringes, and the individual fringes are fairly thick. The tapestry needle with 8/2 cotton for the stitching thread goes through the fringes just above the knots and then through the center loop of the pom pom. I take the thread back around 3 or 4 times and then secure it with several small (hidden) stitches in the fringe/knot.

      Maybe you’ll have a chance to try it again. It does make a fun finishing for a scarf.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Danie says:

    Very nice!
    I would like to try this colorshifts, but i cannot figure out how .
    Could you please explain this ?
    Thanks
    Danie

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