Goose-Eye Squares in Wool

I like goose-eye twill. Do you? I’ve woven it in throws, towels, and rag rugs. I am not sure why this is such a pleasing pattern to me. Maybe because it speaks of classic simplicity.

Brage wool yarn is threaded in the heddles for goose-eye twill.
Testing the pattern. I want the goose-eye diamond to be “square,” so I will weave further to get a consistent beat. Then I will count how many rows it takes to make the diamonds “square.”

I have woven goose-eye twill with and without floating selvedges. This time is without. The advantage is that I can get a cleaner edge without floating selvedges. The disadvantage is that I can get messier edges without floating selvedges. It takes me a little practice to get the selvedges just right, catching some of the outer warp ends. After I get it down, the selvedges will be pretty tidy.

Squares of goose eyes make the overall pattern for this fabric that I hope to make into a small cape for myself. I am using yarn that I had on my shelf. The blue warp stripe is a little too loud for me, but it is what it is, so I’m going to make it work.

Persistence means you keep working at it until it works. And you overlook things (like the blue warp stripe) that it’s too late to change, and make the best of it. Persistence is a virtue when we persist with right things. Persist in faith. Persist in love. And always, persist in hope. Jesus waits for those who persist in leaning on him. Let’s lean in a little closer.

With faith, love, and hope,

Karen

Big Squishy Warp Chains for Christmas

Merry Christmas! Julia is getting dressed with 7/2 Brage wool for a lovely goose-eye twill. Warp chains like this are big and squishy, just begging to be hugged.

Winding the first of two warp bouts.
Thick and fluffy warp chain of 7/2 Brage wool.
Getting ready to beam the warp. Wool in five colors for goose-eye twill.
Getting things ready to spread the warp and then beam it on.

This project is going nearly full width on this 70 cm Glimåkra Julia countermarch loom. My warping slats are exactly 67 cm. (I should have measured the warping slats before I started.) At 65.7 cm weaving width I’m asking for trouble. You can see the problem, right? Those ends can slip right off the edge of the warping slats on the warp beam. I got ‘er beamed, though, with the help of a friend. Hallelujah! The warp ends all ended up in the right place at the right time.

Successfully beamed, with less than a centimeter to spare on each end of the warping slats.
Threading the heddles is a restful, enjoyable part of dressing the loom, especially with wool this soft and squishy.

If we mortals celebrate such earthly victories, imagine the hallelujah’s that all heaven expressed when the Son of God came down to us in the right place at precisely the right time as baby Jesus. That manger in a stable in Bethlehem was not a centimeter nor a millisecond off. This was God’s plan from the beginning to come in person to bring back to himself all who would receive his offer of lasting grace. Hallelujah! The angel chorus rings out, “Glory to God in highest heaven, and peace on earth to those with whom God is pleased.”

May you see the Christmas story in a meaningful way.

Have a truly blessed Christmas,
Karen

Handwoven Monksbelt Receives Favorite Award!

I decided to make another visit this week to the Kerr Arts and Cultural Center gallery in Kerrville, Texas that is exhibiting some of my fiber fine art. And I am greeted by a pleasant surprise:

Joseph’s Coat receives “People’s Choice” Award for Fiber Fine Art.

When you want people to enjoy seeing what you enjoy making, there’s nothing better than being awarded “People’s Choice!”

Humbly grateful,
Karen

My Favorite Handwovens on Display

Five of my favorite handwoven works are on display in a local exhibit. The Southwest Gourd and Fiber Fine Art Show is the current exhibit (through July 1) at the Kerr Arts and Cultural Center in Kerrville, Texas. This is a competitive show featuring artists from across the US. Steve made beautiful wooden hanging and mounting devices for my pieces. Winter Window is a double-binding rag rug that is displayed as a wall hanging. I thoroughly enjoyed the design process for this rag rug, so I am happy that Winter Window received a Judge’s Special Award.

Southwest Gourd and Fiber Fine Art Show at Kerr Arts and Cultural Center in Kerrville, Texas.
Light as Air Lace
Draped Lace in Three-Shaft Lace Weave
Warp: Linen
Weft: Linen
Christmas Snowflakes Triptych
Banners in Six-Shaft Irregular Satin, Drawloom 30 pattern shafts, 148 single units
Warp: Linen/Cotton blend
Weft: Linen
Joseph’s Coat
Wall Hanging in Four-Shaft Swedish Monksbelt
Warp: Cotton
Weft: Wool and Cotton
Winter Window
Rag Rug in Four-Shaft Double Binding
Warp: Cotton
Weft: Cotton fabric strips
Eye of the Beholder
Pictorial Tapestry in Four-Shaft Rosepath
Warp: Linen
Weft: Wool and Linen
Artist Reception and Awards evening. Winter Window receives a Judge’s Special Award.

If you hang a rag rug on the wall it becomes fine art. And I’m ok with that.

May others enjoy seeing what you enjoy making.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

Warped for Good Ten Year Milestone!

Warped for Good is ten years old today! To celebrate I offer you some stats and thoughts and thank you’s.

Number of years: 10

I started this blog when I was still new to weaving. This is a learning journey, and you have been learning with me. THANK YOU!

End of weaving Figs and Coffee. Must wait a bit to roll it out. First I am weaving off the remainder of the warp.


Number of email subscribers: 1000

I started with a handful of friends (about 8 or 10) and a few curious family members. I’m incredibly grateful to those first few who allowed me to test my writing skills on them! I am more than astonished that many, many people trust me to bring them news of what’s happening on my looms. I count all of you as friends, and I am so thankful to have you come sit in my studio with me!

End of this rosepaththreaded warp. This is a lovely way to use up surplus butterfiles that are left from weaving the tapestries. I arranged the butterflies to give a soft progression of value change.

Number of blog posts: 781

Some of you remember when I posted twice a week. When Steve retired four years ago, I slowed down to one post a week.

I am determined to keep weaving until the warp runs out, or I run out of butterflies, whichever comes first. The warp ran out first!


Number of floor looms: 5

Warped for Good started with one 120cm Glimåkra Standard Countermarch loom. I didn’t mean to end up with five floor looms. It just happened. (We’re not counting the band loom or rigid heddle looms.) A big thank you to my friend Joanne Hall who threw open the door to floor loom weaving when I first knocked on that door.

Warping slats separate the pieces on the warp. I leave at least 20cm between pieces so I have enough length to tie knots or braid ends in a tapestry edging.


Nickname: Miss Weave-a-lot

This is husband’s nickname for me because I weave a lot. Steve gets my heartfelt thanks for encouraging me every day.

Finishing includes several steps adding up to many hours. Braiding ends into a tapestry edging, clipping weft tails, stitching weft tails down near the sides, hand hemming the top and bottom. The three main pieces will have a backing that I will stitch on, and a means for hanging or mounting.


Number of months taken off: 6

I have taken a pause for the month of July the past six years.

Two smaller sample pieces have a thicker braided edge. I will leave the braid exposed and tack down the loose warp ends on the back of the pieces.


Number of missed posts (except for the July pauses): 0 (zero)

I started learning watercolor sketching a few months ago for the purpose of making tapestry cartoons from my own sketches. I used a slice of this sketch of my morning coffee and figs for my first attempt to “weave a watercolor sketch.” You can expect more watercolor sketch tapestries in the future as I gain more sketching skills.


Most common email request: Electric Bobbin Winder parts list from Tools Day: Electric Bobbin Winder.

Thank you to Steve for making things for me. Thank you to my Warped for Good friends for every email you send me. I’m especially thrilled when you show me pictures of what you are weaving!

Most visited post: More than Meets the Eye

Very first Warped for Good post: Hidden Strength

Heaven and Earth

Number of delayed meals: Too many to count (according to Steve)

Needless to say, I am thankful to have married a very patient man.

Figs and Coffee

Why the name Warped for Good?
Warped for Good is a metaphor for living a purposeful life as a believer in Jesus. God is the Grand Weaver who warps the loom. My life is the warp. Jesus Christ is the good. The weft is the daily living that aligns with the Master’s plan. Interacting with people, making friends, and sharing interests are all part of that plan. I’m truly grateful to my Grand Weaver for all the friends I’ve gained through this humble home of Warped for Good.

Monarch Wing

May you mark your milestones.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Warped for Good emails are ending today. Please bookmark this site so you can come right here and enjoy this weaving journey with me. Think about setting a reminder for yourself to come and see what’s happening on these looms. See you soon!

Warped for good,
Karen