Last Little Bit of Warp

All the rugs in the set are woven, and there is a little bit of warp left on the loom. Not enough for another rug. Now what? This is where the fun begins! I have some ideas to play out on the loom. End-of-Warp experiments yield fantastic results.

I arrange remaining weft fabric strips into piles of blue, green, red, and yellow/white. Double binding uses a sequence of dark and light wefts. So, I work through the color piles in order, starting with the blues for one pick, and then, going in reverse order, the yellows/whites for the next pick. The result is vertical columns of adjacent blocks that have the color order going in opposite directions, with the reds converging in the middle.

Cushion cover: Off the loom, I fold this attractive rag weave rectangle in half, short sides together, and machine-stitch the two long sides closed. The remaining open end has handwoven bands, from my ever-ready band stash, for tie closures. Voila! With a cushion inserted, I have a new seat cushion for driving the truck. It’s perfect!

Ink and watercolor sketch as part of my new sketchbook practice.

May you use every last bit of your warp.

Happy experimenting,
Karen

Advancing the Warp – Sunset and Sunrise

The Glimåkra Standard makes this project a weaver’s dream. The time-tested loom operates without a glitch, doing everything I direct it to do. These Swedish looms are magnificently designed.

Start of another rug. Multiple rows of stripes for the hem and border.
Weft fabric strips in green, blue, and red.
Pattern develops on the loom.
Central motif of the pattern.
Red stands out in the pattern.
Advancing the warp makes me think of a setting sun. When the sun sets here, it is rising somewhere else.

The sun rises every day. And it sets. Who designed the magnificent operation of the rising and setting of the sun? It’s like the rhythmic opening of the shed for passage of the shuttle. At the Grand Weaver’s direction, the fabric of life advances with every new day. Trust in him.

May you pay attention to the rising sun.

Weave into the sunset,
Karen

Let it Snow! Drawloom Treasures

Let it snow indoors! New Christmas snowflake banners are suspended up high, above our kitchen counter, facing our open living room. The three mostly-blue banners hang in mid-air so they can be viewed from either side. These are lasting treasures from the drawloom that I can bring out year after year. They’ll never get old.

Making loops from a handwoven band for hanging the banners. First, I zigzag to secure ends, and then cut the strips apart.
Handwoven linen band is cut into segments.
Loops are machine-stitched to back of banner hem with two rows of straight basting stitches (easy to remove later).

Christmas is new every year. There are new sights and sounds that add to the season. The message of Christmas is the same as always, though, that God loved us in this way—he sent his Son Jesus to be born into our world so that whoever believes in him may be born into God’s family. The newness is in God’s mercy, new every morning.

Ready for display!

Raise banners of joy to celebrate. Glory to the newborn King.

Merry Christmas!

May you celebrate from the heart.

Glad tidings of Christ’s birth,
Karen

Another Rug Unfurled

I’ve been working on this spaced rep rag rug for a while. I should know what it looks like. So why does unrolling the cloth beam make me feel like a child on Christmas morning awaiting a surprise? It’s because I see only a small portion of the rug at any one time while I am weaving.

Middle section of rug has red fabric strips for weft.
Rows of stripes between sections of the rug.
Third section of rug has dark green fabric strips as weft.
Gimåkra Standard, 120cm. My favorite.
Do you see the flaw in the warp thread (12/6 cotton)? Fortunately, I have already woven the hem and the 6 picks of the warp-thread header. How’s that for a perfect ending? I am cutting off this rug and will tie back on for the next rug. The flaw in the thread will be cut away.
Ready to tie back on very soon.

Not until I cut it off and see the whole rug unfurled on the floor do I really grasp the story this rug is telling. The surprise is pleasant. Threads and fabric strips, and a weaver’s hands (mine), have turned written plans into a compelling story to beautify our surroundings.

It is easy to untie all the knots on the tie-on bar. That gives me plenty of length for tying warp ends into overhand knots in the finishng process.
Unfurled on the floor. First view is a pleasant surprise.

Our Grand Weaver excels at taking simple threads and odd pieces of cloth to create a lasting story. He weaves his plans into our lives to draw us nearer to himself. We see only short segments at a time. From beginning to end, though, our Lord’s skilled and scarred hands demonstrate his love to us. The finished work is more than we imagine.

Warp ends have been knotted, and hem turned under and hand stitched. This rug is ready to beautify the room.

May you experience the joy of pleasant surprises.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

What Will You Finish Weaving this Year?

I am this close to the end of the rug… This series of double-binding rag rugs has been super fun! The question is: What’s next? I think I can squeeze out one more (short) rug on the warp after this one. Will I be able to do the final cutting off before the year’s end? I’m going to try! But then, what after that? I have some ideas… Perhaps I’ll start a new pictorial tapestry on this Ideal.

Measurement tape shows how close this rug is to its final picks.
View under the breast beam shows the rug being rolled up on the cloth beam.
I never cease to be amazed at the possibilities of a weave structure as simple as four-shaft double binding.

We are this close to the end of the year. Is there a project you still hope to complete before this year’s end? Share what it is in the comments.

May you enjoy every moment.

Happy Weaving,
Karen