Goose-Eye Squares in Wool

I like goose-eye twill. Do you? I’ve woven it in throws, towels, and rag rugs. I am not sure why this is such a pleasing pattern to me. Maybe because it speaks of classic simplicity.

Brage wool yarn is threaded in the heddles for goose-eye twill.
Testing the pattern. I want the goose-eye diamond to be “square,” so I will weave further to get a consistent beat. Then I will count how many rows it takes to make the diamonds “square.”

I have woven goose-eye twill with and without floating selvedges. This time is without. The advantage is that I can get a cleaner edge without floating selvedges. The disadvantage is that I can get messier edges without floating selvedges. It takes me a little practice to get the selvedges just right, catching some of the outer warp ends. After I get it down, the selvedges will be pretty tidy.

Squares of goose eyes make the overall pattern for this fabric that I hope to make into a small cape for myself. I am using yarn that I had on my shelf. The blue warp stripe is a little too loud for me, but it is what it is, so I’m going to make it work.

Persistence means you keep working at it until it works. And you overlook things (like the blue warp stripe) that it’s too late to change, and make the best of it. Persistence is a virtue when we persist with right things. Persist in faith. Persist in love. And always, persist in hope. Jesus waits for those who persist in leaning on him. Let’s lean in a little closer.

With faith, love, and hope,

Karen

Big Squishy Warp Chains for Christmas

Merry Christmas! Julia is getting dressed with 7/2 Brage wool for a lovely goose-eye twill. Warp chains like this are big and squishy, just begging to be hugged.

Winding the first of two warp bouts.
Thick and fluffy warp chain of 7/2 Brage wool.
Getting ready to beam the warp. Wool in five colors for goose-eye twill.
Getting things ready to spread the warp and then beam it on.

This project is going nearly full width on this 70 cm Glimåkra Julia countermarch loom. My warping slats are exactly 67 cm. (I should have measured the warping slats before I started.) At 65.7 cm weaving width I’m asking for trouble. You can see the problem, right? Those ends can slip right off the edge of the warping slats on the warp beam. I got ‘er beamed, though, with the help of a friend. Hallelujah! The warp ends all ended up in the right place at the right time.

Successfully beamed, with less than a centimeter to spare on each end of the warping slats.
Threading the heddles is a restful, enjoyable part of dressing the loom, especially with wool this soft and squishy.

If we mortals celebrate such earthly victories, imagine the hallelujah’s that all heaven expressed when the Son of God came down to us in the right place at precisely the right time as baby Jesus. That manger in a stable in Bethlehem was not a centimeter nor a millisecond off. This was God’s plan from the beginning to come in person to bring back to himself all who would receive his offer of lasting grace. Hallelujah! The angel chorus rings out, “Glory to God in highest heaven, and peace on earth to those with whom God is pleased.”

May you see the Christmas story in a meaningful way.

Have a truly blessed Christmas,
Karen

Look at that Cloth Beam!

There is nothing quite as satisfying as seeing a cloth beam filled up with cloth. There are eleven placemats rolled up on there, plus one more stretching from the breast beam on down. All that’s left to do is cut them off, wash, hem, and press. We’ll have new placemats on our dining room table in no time. Yippee!

Twelve placemats are woven. Now it’s time for some pattern play at the end of the warp.
Empty quills at the end of a weaving project are such a happy sight! This is another reason I enjoy playtime at the end of every warp–I can use up thread on the quills.
Look at that cloth beam! Woo Hoo, cutting off will be fun. And hemming all those placemats…I don’t mind.

May your efforts bring satisfying results.

Happy Weaving,

Karen

Eleventh Broken Twill Placemat

It’s a temptation to hurry up when I am this close to the end of the warp. There is only one more placemat to weave, plus a little extra warp after that. I remind myself that there is no reason to rush. A steady pace helps me avoid careless errors that I’m prone to when I’m in a hurry. I’ll have all twelve placemats soon enough.

Broken twill in two blocks.
Green 22/2 Cottolin warp, and 8/1 tow linen weft in dark blue, green, teal, and black. Orange “cutting line” between placemats.
Glimåkra Julia, using eight shafts and eight treadles. Cloth beam is filling up nicely.
Eleventh placemat out of twelve. One more to go, plus a little bit of extra warp.

The Lord shows us how to live. He directs us in a way that sets a steady pace for life. No need to hurry. Enjoy each moment as a gift from his hand.

May your days be free from hurry.

Happy weaving,
Karen

Warped for Good Is Changing the Sett!

Change is an essential element of weaving. How many times do we change the warp on our looms? Or change the sett, the pattern, the color sequence? Change is the rhythm of life.

Weaving 8-shaft broken twill on the Julia is a relaxing way to wind down the day.

After next week, April 11, Warped for Good is starting in a new direction. Instead of posting exclusively on Tuesdays I am switching to a more spontaneous approach. I will keep sharing highlights from my weaving journey, enjoying, as always, your thoughtful feedback in the comments.

Next week you will see the completed small tapestries from my hand-built loom. Soon after that, look for finished spaced rep rag rugs from the Standard. And the crazy critter napkins that are coming up on the drawloom will show my not-so-serious side. There is no shortage of weaving projects around here! I am looking forward to robust interaction with you as we enter this new rhythm.

Six out of twelve placemats are woven. It’s fun to think about seeing the placemats all spread out on the dining room table.

I haven’t decided what to put on the Julia after the placemats are finished. Is there a weaving project you’d like to see? I’m open to suggestions.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: Warped for Good emails are ending after April 11. Please bookmark this site so you can come right here and enjoy this weaving journey with me. Think about setting a reminder for yourself to come and see what’s happening on these looms.

May you know when to change the sett.

Love,
Karen