Tapestry Diary Mistake and Remedy

If you must be in a hurry, then you probably won’t enjoy handweaving. Your hurry up condition will be put to the test even more so with tapestry weaving. And when you make mistakes, the errors can usually be remedied, but it always takes more time. Have patience.

Back of finished small tapestry.

Small tapestry is finished when close inspection reveals a critical omission–there is no twining at the bottom edge of the weaving.

I meant to have this piece finished two months ago, but that’s another story. Now that I have finally woven the last pick I am so eager to take the tapestry off the frame. Wait a minute. What? I forgot to do the twining at the beginning of the tapestry? The twining is essential; it keeps the weft in place when the warp tension is relaxed. Okay, have patience, Karen. Do what needs to be done. Add the twining.

Twining added at bottom of small tapestry.

With little space in which to manipulate threads, the accidentally omitted twining is added in.

Twining added at bottom of small tapestry.

Added twining is pushed into place at the bottom of the small tapestry.

Small tapestry diary. Karen Isenhower

Finished view. Now that the added twining makes a pleasant oultine, I like how the tapestry looks on the frame loom. I may leave it on the frame one more day.

Patience is a virtue. What do you do when your patience is put to the test? Especially with important life issues. Trust in the Lord and be still. Waiting patiently is better than fretting. Is it possible the Lord has some finishing work to do in us, requiring patience, before we move on to the next assignment?

May you find errors while they are still fixable.

Love,
Karen

14 Comments

  • Sandy says:

    Karen, do you do any finishing on the back?

    • Karen says:

      Sandy, I will make an edging with the warp ends when I remove the tapestry from the frame loom, but I don’t do any other finishing on the back, other than trimming all the yarn to about 1/2″.

      Karen

  • kath says:

    Your tapestry is awesomely beautiful and thank you for the life lesson on patience, it comes at just the right time. I have been working on patience for a good while now….I have found it with my fibery fun, now to incorporate it into every day life.

    • Karen says:

      Dear Kath,
      Learning patience is a continual lesson for all of us, isn’t it? Your sweet compliment makes me smile. Thanks!

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

  • Trish says:

    When I think back I don’t remember being taught the virtue of patience when young or in school. So it’s nice to be reminded that it’s ok to go slower and stay calm… I’m learning the outcome is better in what I do and how I feel about myself and my work. Thanks Karen.

    • Karen says:

      That’s a good point, Trish! I think you are right–the outcome IS better when we slow down and stay calm.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts!
      Karen

  • Carrol says:

    Karen your tapestry is such a beautiful artistic work of art you are so gifted and thank you for sharing your fabulous work. Yes that word patience certainly does arise quite often a great posting to remind us of it , as weaving does give us another avenue to practise it, I find the continuous developing and faith of telling myself …that everything in my life will unfold as it should ….slows down the anxiety to calmly work it out. Bless you Karen

    • Karen says:

      Carrol, Thank you!
      I appreciate hearing everyone’s thoughts on patience. It is worthwhile to give consideration to things that make a difference in how our lives function. I am so happy you’ve added your voice to the conversation!

      Blessings to you,
      Karen

  • linda says:

    LOVE the tapistery. I believe patience comes with age. As we get older we come to understand doing a project right may take time and we are ready to give that project that needed time. Along with being a weaver I’m also a knitter and a Quilter. My friends that quilt are always in a hurry to make the next quilt so they have their quilts machine quilted. i, PERSONALLY, hand quilt because I spend the time quietly reflecting on the person the quilt is for hoping they will some day know how much love, patience, joy and happiness went into their quilt. Weaving is the same The planning and the correcting to make the project the right size, for me, takes a lot of thought. threading a thousand ++threads of 20/2 for the warp takes me forever. I can only do 50 threads a day. the weaving is ,in a lot of cases, mindless work unless it’s a new complicated pattern, but it all takes patience to make it come out right. God given or insight from ageing ,patience is a blessing we hopefully will all attain. LPJ, linda

    • Karen says:

      Hi Linda,
      Thank you for your kind words. I’m glad you like the way it turned out!
      I’m grateful that God designed us to gain insight as we age. And I’m grateful for the insight you share!
      Love,
      Karen

  • Colleen says:

    Hi Karen,
    Beautiful work! Too bad you have to take it off the loom as it makes a fine frame.

    I am dealing with major challenges right now (newly widowed and new health issues) such as do I stay here or move. If I move, where on earth should I go. If I stay how will I care for the house and acreage. I find that my textile and fiber work are calming and help me to remember to be more patient with God. I can lose my self in the work and have the peace of mind for extensive prayer and conversation with God.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Colleen, I like it on the frame, too! I have to remove it, though, to start another tapestry. It could get costly to purchase a new frame loom for every new tapestry. 🙂

      It is sweet to hear how the Lord is carrying you through your time of waiting and seeking. I’m sorry for the hard things you have had to go through.
      Love,
      Karen

  • Amy says:

    Hello! Thank you for sharing your beautiful work! I wondered if you would grant permission for me to share your images in a small Sunday School (with credit), accompanied by the Tapestry Poem? Thank you for letting me know 🙂
    Amy

    • Karen says:

      Hi Amy, Thank you for asking! I would be honored for you to use my images for your Sunday school class. The Tapestry Poem is dear to my heart.

      All the best,
      Karen

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Tapestry Diary: Day One

A tapestry diary seems like a fun challenge. Weaving a small amount each day gives a visual journal of woven ideas over time. I have seen some examples of tapestry diaries that I admire. I like the concept, but I feel tentative about starting one myself.

Freja Tapestry Frame by Glimakra

Simple tapestry frame, 26 1/2 x 21 inches / 67 x 53cm, is just the right size for a tentative tapestry diary. This one is the Freja Tapestry Frame by Glimakra. You can see the warp wrapping around the teeth for a sett of about 10.5 epi.

Will I have enough ideas to fill that space, or enough little bits of time to weave, or the consistency to keep at it? These are my doubts. On the other hand, the frequent practice will help me improve in tapestry techniques; and, watching the tapestry grow should be fascinating. And deep down I know I can’t really use up all my ideas. The more you express ideas, the more ideas you gain, as proven by other tapestry weavers, like Janette Meetze.

Beginning a tapestry diary.

Weaving tapestry from the back, as I learned from Joanne Hall.

Weaving small tapestry from the back.

After a row of twining, five picks give a solid line across for the beginning of the tapestry. Using three to four strands of thin wool (Färo and Mora) allows for ease of blending colors.

Day one of Tapestry Diary 2015

Day One.

This is a picture of generosity, as well. When you give, it is like planting seeds. Sow seeds generously and you will see a bountiful harvest. A generous person always has enough to give. Their “giving cup” is continually replenished. I can at least start the tapestry diary. Being intentional makes it happen. Planting ideas, planting seeds, watching for things to grow.

~What will you be intentional about this year?

May you never run out of ideas.

(Make sure you don’t miss the new video at the top of Warped for Good’s About page. Let me know what you think!)

Starting the Year with You,
Karen

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Where the Weft Is Vulnerable

The outside rows of a rag rug are vulnerable. Twining secures the weft, making it a good way to begin and end a rag rug. I cut a length of rug warp thread two and a half times the width of the rug. Starting on the left side, with the length of thread folded in half, the top half goes under, and the lower half goes over each successive warp end.

Twining at the end of a rag rug on the loom.

Twining separates the warp ends evenly and secures the weft. At the end of the row I weave in the ends, and then, beat twice with the beater to push the row of twining firmly into place.

Is it really necessary to secure the weft? When the rug is under tension on the loom it seems like everything is holding together just fine. It is tightly woven, with the weft firmly packed in. Yes. It is necessary. The rug will start falling apart the minute it is cut from the loom. Twining keeps the most vulnerable place of the weaving intact.

Faith is the vulnerable spot where you allow yourself to be loved by God. Wrapped in his mercy and his grace, our weakest point is no longer our entry into failure, but where we are kept in his security. Your faith is the point of access, the opening, for your maker to show his strength to make you complete.

May you rest secure.

Etsy Announcement!
My new Etsy WarpedforGood Shop  is open! I would love for you to come and browse. As my tried and true blog friends, your feedback means a lot to me. Please let me know what you think!

You may remember seeing the progress on some of the items in the shop, like the Warp Rep Rug, the Rosepath Rugs, and the Cutest Little Loom Rugs. The rugs you see on the loom now will be posted in my Etsy shop when they are finished!

Your Friend,
Karen

4 Comments

  • Laurie Mrvos says:

    Karen –
    Bravo! Your shop looks terrific. Great pieces. Makes me proud to be a weaver, and I want to weave like you when I grow up! I bet they’ll get swiped up quickly!
    Laurie

  • BARB MUELLER says:

    GREETINGS KAREN
    I JUST STARTED DOING A LITTLE SELF TAUGHT WEAVING. I THOUGHT RATHER THAN SPEND $$ ON A LOOM, I WOULD TRY IT WITH THE HOOLA HOOP. I’M HOOKED. I FOUND IT FILLS THOSE TIMES WHEN I AM ALONE. I HAVE BEEN SEARCHING TO FIND A PLAN ON MAKING A SIMPLE LOOM. AS I GET TO WHERE I CAN MASTER THE LOOM, I WILL WORK MYSELF UP. I HAVE MS AND IT HELPS TO FOCUS ON COGENT THINKING AND EYE HAND COORDINATION. PLUS HELPS THE ARTHRITIS. I PRAY I WILL STILL BE ABLE TO CONTINUE MAKING CRAFTS. THANK YOU FOR ALL THE BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS.
    GOD BLESS
    BARB

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