Process Review: Garden Rosepath Rag Rugs

A rosepath rag rug puts beauty under our toes. Strange? Yes, strangely wonderful. Let’s fill our homes with handmade goodies. Let’s make smiles happen in every corner. Let’s be different and make a difference. Live with beauty underfoot.

Three of these rugs have already gone to their new homes. (See Tied Up in Knots.) The remaining three rugs bring outdoor garden beauty indoors.

Rosepath rag rugs with a garden theme. Karen Isenhower
From bottom to top: Planting Seeds, Prayer Garden, Mystery Garden.

Come with me now to review the process of making these six rosepath rag rugs.

As Shelter in Place becomes a necessity for many, consider these words of encouragement from the book of Psalms: For He [the Lord] will conceal me in His shelter in the day of adversity. Psalm 27:5a

May you have smiles in every corner of your home.

Peace,
Karen

22 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    They are beautiful!
    Be well, Karen!

  • Charlotte says:

    Ohhhhhhhhhhh my dearest! I so enjoyed your video! Thank you for sharing the journey accompanied with lovely music. You are dear and precious and it reflects in all you life and that which you create!

    Much love to you…so near and yet so far…Charlotte

  • Angela says:

    Absolutely beautiful rugs!! Such soothing music. I was wondering how wide your fabric strips were.

    Thank you.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Angela, I’m glad you like the rugs! The music is courtesy of Apple photos, where I create the slideshow.

      I cut my fabric strips 3/4″ (2cm). The hem area strips are half that size – 1cm. This is what I have found to be the norm in most of the Swedish rag rug books I’ve seen.

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Margaret Cook says:

    I am going to make a rosepath rag rug. I have linen for the warp and rug strips that I plan to do for some color in the rug. Can you share what sett was used for the rugs. And did you use s tabby in between each pattern weft? This is a new pattern for me and I want to get all the info right.
    Thank you for any help.
    Margaret

    • Karen says:

      Hi Margaret, Hooray for your rosepath rag rug endeavor!

      My sett is 8 epi for the rag rugs. Yes, I used tabby in between each pattern weft, except for one rug that was pattern only, with no tabby. I predict you will have a great time weaving your rug.

      Let me know if you have any more questions I can help you with. You can always reach me through the “Get in Touch” tab at the top of the webpage.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • D'Anne says:

    Your rugs are beautiful, Karen! Stay healthy and keep weaving.

  • marlene toerien says:

    Hi Karen please translate plattvav for me, when I googled it your name popped up with an example, it looks like monksbelt but I am not sure that is correct.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marlene, You must be referring to plattväv towels that I made a while back. I don’t know about translating it, except I think platt means flat, so flat weave??

      I’m not an expert, except for my own limited experience with plattväv and monksbelt. They are very similar, both would be considered overshot weaves because they have pattern weft with tabby in between. Monksbelt usually has two pattern treadles, whereas plattväv has only one pattern treadle (at least in the plattväv I have woven.)

      I hope that helps.
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Lyna says:

    Another comforting passage is Psalm 91, especially verses 3-7. In uncertain times our Father God is our refuge and solid rock.
    God Bless!

  • Cynthia says:

    Beautiful. You and Steve stay safe I’m praying I don’t run out of thread for quilt making. I may try and call later in the week

  • Sandy says:

    Gorgeous! You’ve inspired me to think about making a few rag rugs for my new home.

    Stay safe and healthy in these troubling times.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Sandy, Thank you! I do hope it works out for you to make some rag rugs for your new home. It’s a wonderful way to personalize your space.

      Keep in health and blessings,
      Karen

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Tied Up in Knots

Every time you cut off a warp there is more to do before the woven material is ready for its end purpose. Do you enjoy tying knots? And, hemming rugs by hand? I don’t mind completing these final steps. It’s part of the whole weaving process. Three of the six rosepath rag rugs are now finished. Truly finished.

Six new rosepath rag rugs, ready for finishing!
Six rosepath rag rugs. Rugs are cut apart and warping-slat dividers have been removed.

Tying the warp ends in overhand knots permanently secures the weft. These knots won’t work loose. I turn the hem, concealing the knots; and stitch the hem down. After I sew on my label, the work is complete.

Tying knots to finish a rag rug.
Warp ends are tied into overhand knots, four ends at a time.
Rag rug finishing.
Ends are trimmed to 1 inch.
Hand hemming a rosepath rag rug.
Hem is folded under and pressed. The needle catches a warp end from the fold and a warp end from the body of the rug. Rug warp is used as thread for hemming.

Jesus famously said, “It is finished,” when he was on the cross. His completed good work replaces our work of trying to be good enough, trying to fix everything, trying to control our lives. Our knots won’t hold. We can trust that his finished work will never be undone. God loves you. Trusting him is loving him back.

Rosepath rag rug, fresh off the loom.
One completed rug, named “Treasures,” for my neighbor’s home.
Handwoven rag rugs, named "Blessed Assurance." Made for a friend.
Pair of completed rugs, named “Blessed Assurance,” for another neighbor’s home.

May love securely hold you.

Trusting,
Karen

12 Comments

  • Beth says:

    They are beautiful, Karen!
    I’m curious, do you wet finish the rugs before using them on the floor?

  • Charlotte says:

    Blessed assurance…Jesus is mine…oh what a foretaste of Glory divine…

    I adore your two rugs entitled “Blessed Assurance”…absolutely adore them!

    As you may be aware, Art Camp was cancelled. Now…the Bluebonnet Rally is cancelled. For 9 years…our April has been spent serving 250 people in Bandera. Goodness…we are quarantined and home. Now, I have this wonderful time before me to play in the studio. We need to talk!!!!!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Charlotte, The “Blessed Assurance” rugs are showstoppers, much to my surprise, since there is not a bit of blue in them. 🙂

      This is my story, this is my song. Our Lord is song-worthy all the day long.

      Love you,
      Karen

  • ellen b santana says:

    i heard in a sermon that the phrase it is finished in the original language was words used in commerce, to signify that the debt was paid. so cool.

  • Kristin G says:

    Such lovely rugs and words, Karen! I’m so glad I got to see one of them up close at the guild meeting – they really are beautiful. You made my heart smile with the ‘Blessed Assurance” named rugs. What a wonderful song to have playing in my mind today.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Kristin, I’m always happy when someone has a song in their heart. Glad to contribute to that!

      Your kind words are such an encouragement to me.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Elisabeth Munkvold says:

    What a beautiful bunch of rag rugs you have made!
    I am cutting rags at the moment…in between other textile projects 🙂
    We are so blessed to always have something to do, even more so now when staying home has become our new daily life. The healthcare system needs for as many of us as possible to do just that!! My mom has been on lockdown (in Norway) for a week already.
    Take care and stay healthy!
    Love, Elisabeth

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, I’m glad to hear you have another rag rug project in the works. I agree, it is a blessing to have no shortage of things to do at home. It’s a good time to pray for our mothers, and those more vulnerable.

      Keep in health.
      Love,
      Karen

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Rosepath Whispers

This fifth rag rug on the warp has the same classic rosepath design as the others. This rug, however, has rosepath as a whispered hint instead of the usual bold statement. Colorful beauty? Yes. Yet, it’s quiet. Restful.

*Rosepath Whispers* rag rug.
Hints of rosepath pattern.
Rosepath Whispers rag rug.
Design plan sits nearby for reference as I weave.

The rosepath pattern is fully present, but soft-spoken. In the pattern areas, there is only slight contrast between the pattern weft and ground weave weft. The print fabric that is used for some of the pattern weft leaves spots of color, which also helps to blend the pattern into the background. The hint of a pattern makes you take a second look to see what is really there.

Winnie the Pooh is going into this rag rug.
Winnie the Pooh fabric is used for some of the ground weave weft.
Texture from rosepath pattern.
Texture of the raised rosepath pattern is clearly seen from the edge.

A restful person is like that, making us want to take a second look to see what’s behind that demeanor. Rest is a form of trust. Trusting God’s grace means believing that God will give us what we need. And that brings rest, the kind that is on the inside. Deep inside, where the pattern of grace is fully present, our being is transformed. And whatever is on the inside will show on the outside. Colorful beauty? Yes; and quiet, too. Restful.

May you be restful on the inside.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

12 Comments

  • Wanda Bennett says:

    This is beautiful!

  • Nannette says:

    Good Morning Karen. I just wove a rag rug using a print for the background of a simple rosepath. The pattern is in colors of the tabby. A subtle pattern is a beautiful thing. Your word: Whisper…

    Thank you for sharing.

    Nannette

  • Linda says:

    Very interesting!

  • Joanna says:

    Restful is such an underrated quality. Thanks for the reminder. I think I like this rug the most.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joanna, In our busy world, it’s refreshing to find rest, and live in a restful state. This rug may be my favorite on this warp. I’m looking forward to seeing it rolled out on the floor.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Kathryn says:

    This is so beautiful! What a fun project. How do you get that part of the pattern to raise up like that?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Kathryn, You are right—this is a very fun project. The rosepath pattern stands out because the pattern rows (with longer floats) are sandwiched between tabby (plain weave) rows. This is one of the reasons I enjoy weaving rosepath patterns—the pattern seems to be elevated above the background.

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Anonymous says:

    thank you so much for your lovely website and for sharing your talent and beautiful work and your stick-toitveness through the years of weaving. Your work is inspirational as well as your encouragement and words of wisdom and encouragement. Sometimes we reach and find something that we need to hear or see when we are in a downtime and trying to come to life impacting decisions and feeling a lost. That was my experience today, but the words on your site were a reminder that God is in the picture and hope is always there. Thanks again, Nancy

    • Karen says:

      Dear Nancy, You are saying important things–God is in the picture. Yes, he certainly is. Hope is always there–Yes, always!

      It’s always my prayer, Nancy, that the words I write would meet the need of someone who reads them. It seems that God is answering prayers from both of us.

      Hugs,
      Karen

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Looms Quietly Waiting

Merry Christmas Eve to you. Looms are quietly waiting to resume their rhythm. Meanwhile, songs of joy and hope fill the air because the Savior of the world is born.

Pictorial tapestry on Glimakra Standard loom. Only 6 cm remaining.
1. The Standard
Pictorial tapestry, with only 6 centimeters of the cartoon remaining.
Rosepath rag rug completed on the Glimakra Ideal loom.
2. The Ideal
Second rosepath rag rug completed. Two short rugs yet to be woven on this warp.
Wool handwoven scarves.
3. The Little Loom
First of two scarves is started. I am using the Stardust draft by Mona Nielsen, published in Happy Weaving, from Vävmagasinet, but with yarn and colors of my choosing.
Drawloom getting set up for weaving rag rugs with single unit drawloom.
4. The Drawloom
Warp is threaded and tied-on. Single-unit draw cords have been prepared. Next step: Attaching draw cords to pattern units. And then, tie up treadles and start weaving!

May your night be silent and holy, calm and bright.

Happy Holy-days,
Karen

17 Comments

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Imagine Rag Rugs on the Drawloom

Rag rug weaving on the drawloom! I can only imagine the delight. In the meantime, the drawloom is getting dressed. It takes time to group the pattern heddles into units, add lingos, thread pattern shafts, thread eight ground shafts, sley the reed, move the ground shafts and pattern shafts to their positions, and tie on. After I finish all that I can think about adding all the single-unit draw cords and finish tying up. Whew!

Winding a warp for the next drawloom project.
Warping reel is in a corner of the drawloom studio. When not in use, the reel is folded up and pushed against the wall.
Warp chains of 12/6 cotton rug warp. Drawloom rag rugs!
Warp chains of 12/6 cotton rug warp.
Drawloom - rug warp is ready for threading.
Warp is beamed and ready for threading.

I became acquainted with the single-unit drawloom at Joanne Hall’s studio (see Drawlooms in Montana), but this is my first go at it on the drawloom in my studio. Because of the reward that awaits, I will gladly tackle all the tasks of dressing this loom. Weaving rag rugs on a drawloom will be phenomenal!

Pattern heddles and weights for prepping the drawloom.
Pattern heddles are hanging on the breast beam for grouping into pattern units. A lingo is hung on each unit.
Threading the drawloom.
Pattern heddles have been threaded. You can see the lingos hanging below. Ground heddles are now being threaded. Straight draw threading on eight ground shafts.

Joy sees hidden treasure. We go to great lengths to unearth high-value treasure. Jesus did this, seeing us as the reward. That’s what Christmas celebrates. Jesus left his splendor in heaven to come to earth as a baby. He entered this world and endured the worst because of the joy set before him. He did it all for the joy of having us in fellowship with God. We come to him and find that we are the Grand Weaver’s reward.

May your joy be full.

Joy to you,
Karen

16 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    I must admit that I find this mind-boggling and will be sitting back, admiring your work on this one. 😉 Amazing!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth, It’s all part of the process, so it just means taking a step at a time. I enjoy the steps to get there, but I sure am looking forward to weaving this.

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Geri Rickard says:

    Ooohhh, I can’t wait to see this!

  • Janet giardina says:

    Good morning Karen,
    I’m just coming to the end of my first draw warp, 16/2, and I’m very curious to see the end result of using the drawloom to weave rag rugs and the 12/6 warp. Look forward to the process and end result.
    Janet

    • Karen says:

      Hi Janet, Congratulations on completing your first drawloom warp! I have wondered about weaving rag rugs on the drawloom ever since I began to understand what can be done with a drawloom. I’m eager to jump in!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Betsy says:

    Ooooh, I can’t wait to see how this looks!!

  • Joanne Hall says:

    Bravo, yes, joy indeed. I have loved this type of project, but I have not put it on my loom. I look forward to seeing your photos as you progress through this warp and weave the rug.
    Joanne

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joanne, Your encouragement means a lot to me. It’s comforting to know that you are looking over my shoulder. We’re going to have fun with this!

      Joy indeed,
      Karen

  • Lyna says:

    Looks fascinating! How long is your warp? As complicated as dressing the drawloom looks, I’d be inclined to put on a looooog warp!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lyna, Yes, a long warp would make perfect sense. I’m still in the learning stages, though, so I want a lot of practice in dressing the drawloom. This warp is long enough to weave two large rugs.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Carol Berry says:

    Hi Karen,
    I am eager to see the rag rugs you weave on your drawloom. What is the sett, using the 12/6 rug warp? and why have you chosen an 8-shaft ground weave? Your blog posts are a joy!
    All the Best, Carol Berry

    • Karen says:

      Hi Carol, I’m using a 35/10 metric reed and the sett is 7 ends per cm. The ends are doubled. That’s close to 18 doubled ends per inch.
      I’m using a draft by Kerstin Ålsling-Sundberg from “Damast,” edited by Lillemor Johansson. Her draft calls for the eight-shaft ground weave. When I have more experience I’ll be able to tell you why.

      Thanks for joining in!
      Karen

  • Sue MacLeod says:

    I really enjoy reading your blog. It is so inspirational to see all that you do. I am looking forward to see the progression of this project.

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