Welcome to My Loom

The computer is a worthwhile instrument for creating designs to weave. I like the flexibility and repeatability it gives me for drawloom designs. I’m also using the computer to develop the cartoon for my next pictorial tapestry. The computer work takes time—usually more time than I think it should.

Cottolin bath towels on the loom.
Come in our front door to see what is on the loom. Nearing the end of the first bath towel on this cottolin warp.

When I sit at the loom, though, time slips away unnoticed. This is where I’d rather be.

Cottolin bath towels on the loom.
Deep borders on these towels have treadling changes and contrast-thread inlay for added interest.
Start of the second cottolin bath towel on the loom.
Red cutting line is woven between the first and second towels.
Weaving bath towels on the Glimakra Standard loom.
First bath towel begins to wrap around the cloth beam.

I’m starting the second of four bath towels on my Glimåkra Standard. The loom, with its colored threads and cloth, is the first thing to greet you as you come in our front door. Welcome. Let’s put the computer away for a while and simply enjoy ourselves. There’s no better time than now.

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Previously woven hand towels that match these bath towels have not yet been used. They are presently folded and displayed in a pottery bowl on the dining room table in the next room.

May you make time for making.

Happy Planning and Weaving,
Karen

12 Comments

  • Beth says:

    These are beautiful! The loom is also my happy place.

  • Tena says:

    Your posts always inspire me. I’ve been weaving about a year. I hope to be as good as you someday.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Tena, Thank you for your kind words. Welcome to the world of weaving. All it takes is to keep going, a step at a time. You’re almost there!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Love this! I have done one kitchen towel in a cottolin warp & weft, and it is wonderfully absorbent! Definitely planning to do more! What kind of loom is the one in these photos? It looks very tall, and I love the way the woven cloth wraps around the front beam with a board in front to protect it.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Caroline, Yes, my cottolin towels are my favorite because of their absorbency.

      This is a Glimåkra Standard loom, 120cm (47″), countermarche. The fabric protection board at the front is great for protecting the cloth on the breast beam. The fabric protection board also allows me to lean up against it, which takes strain off my back as I reach to throw the shuttle.

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Good morning Karen,

    My favorite colors sprung up when I opened your blog. How neat the edges are, rolled under the loom.

    Yes! There is order in the world. ( spent last night in the basement sorting through memories wrapped in 1997 newsprint. 3 piles.. Keep, sell, gift to children. :).) Sweet, sweet organization courtesy of warped for good!!
    Thank YOU.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, It’s interesting how certain colors can draw us in. I’m glad that you are finding your way through this transition time. Thank you for your sweet encouragement.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie says:

    These towels are gorgeous. Are you really going to let people use them?
    We always had display towels growing up that my mother gave strict instructions to look at, don’t touch! I think these would be perfect for that.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annie, Thank you! I understand the sentiment. It gives me joy when people use the towels and other articles I make. These bath towels (and hand towels) are specifically for Steve and me to use. My first attempt at bath towels a few years ago didn’t go so well. Let’s just say those “towels” became bath mats. So we are looking forward to some decent beautiful handwoven bath towels.

      I will be happy if we can use these towels so much that we wear them out. That will mean I get to make some more. 🙂

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Barbara Mitchell says:

    Like you, I enjoy the slow, thoughtful process of working at the loom, as the stress and cares of the world are forgotten. These towels look calm and peaceful, and yet still a little exciting, with the little runs of twills and colour accents. Simply beautiful.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Barbara, I agree with you. The loom gives us a chance to take a break from normal stress and cares as we put our attention on the rhythm of weaving.
      My favorite thing about these towels is the little twill accents that run through them. Thank you for your sweet words.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

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Handweaving Dilemma

I am making great progress on my drawloom rag rug, closing in on the final segment. And then, I take a picture and the camera reveals something I had failed to see. A mistake! Here is the dilemma that I’m sure other weavers face, too. It’s an internal dialogue. I can live with the error. Or, can I? No one will notice. Well, I certainly will notice. But I am sooo close to the end. I really don’t want to undo the last forty minutes of weaving. What would you do?

Drawloom rag rug.
Error in the rug escapes my notice.
Mistake in the weaving, exposed by taking a photo.
Photo reveals my mistake.

Back it up. Using the chart that I follow for pulling draw cords, unit by unit, I work my way back until I get to the error. On reflection, doing the task is easier than thinking about doing it.

Removing weft to fix an error.
Backing up.
Single-unit drawloom.
One single unit draw cord makes all the difference. This cord should have been drawn in the affected rows.
Rag weft is taken out to correct an error.
Undone. Weft is removed. The mistake has been taken out.
Drawloom rag rug. Correcting an error.
Ready to start fresh from here.

My feelings can fool me. I don’t feel like going back and correcting my mistake. This is the time to pause and listen. Wisdom is at the door. Wisdom requires thinking, and listening, and time. Time is my friend, if I refrain from hurry. Wisdom is much like the skill of an experienced craftsman—one who understands precision and artistic expression and do-overs. Wisdom knows that patience is powerful. The easiest way to do something often forfeits the greatest rewards.

May you keep your ear at wisdom’s door.

Peace,
Karen

14 Comments

  • Such a wonderfully wise decision and if anyone can do it – make that small mistake go away and result in a perfect weave – you can and DID! I am always so inspired by your work, and follow along with great joy! Thanks for sharing – inspiring as always!
    Will you tell me what the blue cloth is? So beautifully bold and it looks like a hand dye or print. I am a fairly new weaver and love experimenting and making rag rugs.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Bethany, One of the best things about making rag rugs is getting to play with beautiful fabrics. There are two different blue fabrics here. They alternate. One is a solid blue with some variance in color, and the other is a small bright floral print. Both are 100% cotton quilting fabrics that I have left over from other rag rug weaving projects. Combining the two fabrics makes the blue very rich.

      Thanks for your kind words!
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Charlotte says:

    Wisdom and patience and un-weaving prevailed. 40 minutes of weaving taken out. Wise! You would have spent the lifetime of the rug with your eye going to the mistake. Wisdom…a wonderful gift to us! He perfects us only a daily basis, if we allow. Always, I seek His wisdom and ask that He bless the work of my hands. This oftentimes means…un-weaving due to my mistake. I began weaving my sheep, late yesterday. When I removed the temple, I realized one had only 3 legs. You know the rest of my story….

    • Karen says:

      Hi Charlotte, Yes, if I had kept going (and I came so close to doing that), I would always have seen that one spot on the rug.

      Oh, yes, I know the rest of your story. Another lesson learned.

      Love,
      Karen

  • Donns says:

    I just faced the same dilemma. Something didn’t look right after several inches of weaving a project from Handwoven. So I stopped and googled “Handwoven corrections 2019” and sure enough there was a correction to the draft. I had to walk away and let it all sink in before I could unweave and then decide how to proceed. As I always tell myself, it’s only time.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Donns, Wise words – “it’s only time.” Time is something we all have. I’m glad you caught the mistake while you could still do something about it.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Wisdom…. A blessing to take another look before proceeding. I’ve learned so much from walking away to clear my head… Then when I return, the mistake is obvious.

    Is wisdom what happens between finishing and enjoying the journey?

    Blessings upon your journey.

  • Betsy says:

    Isn’t that always the way? It’s soooo difficult in our minds, but easy once we actually do it. Happens over and over to me.

    Can’t wait to see this off the loom!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Betsy, I don’t know why I have to learn the same lesson over and over. Oh, for wisdom and patience to sink in.

      It will be a few more days, now, but I’m near the end of the rug.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Allison says:

    You are right, taking it out actually takes less time than thinking about taking it out!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Allison, Next time, maybe I will just do it instead of thinking about not wanting to do it. It sounds like you’ve been there, too.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Yvonne Taylor says:

    Well I would just take a large darning needle anf go over the mistake and hide the ends. You will be more careful from now on Im sure. Ha ha. Who hasn’t done something like this?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Yvonne, Trust me, I considered doing just that. And I will probably need to darn other mistakes that I’ve missed. But I’m glad I went back to fix the error now. Easier, really, than covering it up later.

      I think we’ll all done something like this, haven’t we?

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

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Waiting to Cut Off the Tapestry

I desperately want to unroll this tapestry so we can see the whole thing. The tapestry and its linen header are finished. But it’s not quite time to cut it off. First, I am weaving the rest of this beautiful linen warp. Not another tapestry, just a lacey rosepath weave using a tomato orange 6/1 tow linen weft.

One more row of weft for this Siblings tapestry!
With one more row of wool weft this tapestry is completed. Ten picks of linen in a plain-weave header follow. After that, a few rows of wool weft (leftover butterflies) are woven to secure the weft.
Linen on linen, with linen hemstitching.
Hemstitching secures the weft for this lacey weave.

It won’t take much time to weave this off, especially compared to the slower process of weaving the tapestry. Hemstitching, which does take time, will help keep this loosely-woven piece from unraveling when the warp is finally cut off. Soon enough, we will enjoy the full view of the completed Siblings tapestry.

View of the messy underside of the tapestry.
View of the messy underside of the tapestry.
Only a short distance remains on this beautiful linen warp.
Only a short distance remains on this beautiful linen warp.

Time. We all have it. And yet none of us knows how much of it we have. How many days have we been given? We don’t know. Time is temporary. Imagine a place where time isn’t measured. That’s heaven. Our short time here is but a pilgrimage to another destination. Our trust in Jesus opens heaven’s doors. In the meantime, the Grand Weaver’s warp will be woven, and not wasted, to the very end.

May you complete your pilgrimage in the time you’ve been given.

Blessings on your journey,
Karen

4 Comments

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Drawloom Cords and Handles

My first drawloom warp used ten pattern shafts, which was plenty. I have now installed the cords and draw handles for all fifty pattern shafts, so the sky’s the limit! (See Process Review: First Drawloom Warp)

Adding draw cords to the drawloom.
Adding draw cords. I stand on the foot beam to reach up to the top of the draw frame to pull cords through the holes.
Draw cords are added in order.
Draw cords are added in order.

Adding all these draw cords and handles is a big job. It involves a cord threader and scissors and time—reaching, going back and forth, measuring, cutting, tying. Over and over. It’s not hard, but it seems endless. Yet for some strange reason this job is entirely enjoyable. I feel like an architect and builder, a dreamer and investor. It’s incredible to step back and see the structure that this effort has produced. And this is merely the set up. Can you imagine the weaving prospects?!

This is how we build good structures in our lives. Intentional, persistent, focused. Listen well. Over and over. The way we speak makes a difference in the way we listen. When we speak with grace, seasoned for the hearer, we ready ourselves to listen. Our cord threader is our unselfish attentiveness to pull someone else’s thoughts and questions toward our understanding. With this beautiful structure we are ready for anything. Accomplished through the grace of God, the sky’s the limit!

Drawloom ready for weaving!
Drawloom with fifty draw handles, a sight to behold.

May your words be seasoned with grace.

Getting ready,
Karen

15 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    Looks so complicated!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth, I know it looks complicated. That’s what I always thought. I’ve been surprised to learn that it’s actually a series of simple steps to set this up.

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Oh, my goodness. The loom set up is a piece of sculpture. Precision. Symmetry one view. Asymmetrical from another direction. Soooo beautiful.
    Function that is a finely tuned instrument.
    Thankful for sharing.
    Nannette

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, Yes, It is a piece of sculpture. A fluid sculpture. You’ve given it a beautiful description.

      All the best,
      Karen

      • Nannettte says:

        At one o’clock this morning I finished weaving up the last of the rag on the overshot warp. The plan was to cut off the 3 rugs and re-tie the warp to use to explore tapestry as described in one of your more recent blogs.

        Curmugeon66 uses a stick to stabilize the woven edge until it can be machine hemmed. So… I pulled out a stick. Put it on the beater bar while I pulled the 3 rugs from the loom.. You know where I am going with this.

        By the time I heard the stick hit the treadles, hours of carpet warp had been pulled from the reed. It was hot and sticky and I was tired.

        This morning’s Sound Bites daily devotional title was ‘Paying Attention’.
        Today’s plan is to put a sewing machine hem on the rag rugs and pack them up to take to the future retirement home.

        There is nothing else to say… Well maybe “Praise God”

  • Lynette says:

    Please send more posts on how it works! Will be eager to see! Also, how wide of a Glimakra Standard Loom is needed to fit all 50 pattern shafts? (Minimum width) It looks like it will be fun.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lynette, I will post my progress with this loom. My Glimåkra Standard is 120cm (47”), but I think this same draw frame fits on a smaller Standard or Ideal—maybe 100cm (39”). Someone who knows for sure can comment on this to verify.

      It will certainly be fun! That I know.

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

  • Arlene Favreau-Pysher says:

    I love the spiritual aspect of weaving and being that listener…. and incorporating the other person into our being …thank you for your post. Arlene

    • Karen says:

      Hi Arlene, Thanks for your thoughtful words!

      I’m so grateful for the Lord’s grace to show us how to make others more important than ourselves.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie says:

    That whole set up just boggles my mind! Nannette’s description is perfect!

    Hopefully, I will have an opportunity to come see this in person one day, Karen.
    In the mean time, I am looking forward to some videos of you weaving with this.

    50?! I really don’t know if I could keep that all straight!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annie, It’s my hope to make some short videos of the drawloom. Thanks for the prompt.

      Yes, 50 pattern shafts. That means 50 handles to pull. The more, the merrier!

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Judy says:

    Karen thank you for your posts on the drawloom. I have an old countermarche loom that I would love to build a drawloom for. I find this very interesting and can’t wait to see what you do with it. I have taken a basic drawloom course. You have inspired me to get started.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Judy, How wonderful that you are dreaming of building a drawloom for your countermarch! Dreams are where the action begins!

      Happy Weaving,
      Karen

  • Keri Mae says:

    Beautiful post!

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Tapestry at Full Snail Speed

I am determined to have this off the loom before it’s time to move again. I know exactly how many “weaving days” I have left in this apartment. Steve’s retirement is just around the corner. His last day at work will be our last day here. And I know exactly how many centimeters I have left to weave on this piece. We already moved the loom once in the middle of this tapestry. Once is enough! I intend to make significant weaving progress every single day.

Measure tape shows progress on the tapestry weaving.

My measure tape shows that I have woven 80 centimeters. I will cross the finish line when I reach 125 centimeters.

Now that the image of the lizard is finished all the way to his toes, no more pretty green, blue, or red butterflies. I am removing anything that clutters my focus. Full (snail) speed ahead!

Weaving a lizard in four-shaft tapestry.

Lizard’s foot tries to grip the breast beam. There is no longer a need for butterflies in the lizard’s colors. Only the background log remains.

Weaving four-shaft tapestry on a Glimakra Ideal loom.

All the green, blue, and red butterflies have been removed. A simple color palette remains–white, yellow, tan, gray, brown, and black.

Faith is that kind of determination. Faith is more than thinking you believe something or someone. It’s pouring yourself into pure-hearted focus to trust fully in God. Faith is being so convinced that Jesus is the answer that you will stop at nothing to reach him. Where there’s that kind of will, there’s a way.

May you reach your most-pressing goal.

Your speedy snail,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Beautiful description of faith! Our strength comes from God and He helps us to persevere as we move toward the goal. TRUST is the fuel that keeps us forging ahead. God bless you as you reach this goal…and others, ahead for you. 🙂

  • Good morning Karen,
    ~ 2/3rds of the way complete with most of the kinks worked out. Nice place to be in. A firm foundation established. Everything in place to complete your tapestry.

    Kind regards,

    Nannette

  • Annie says:

    I hope the determination to reach your goal will not rob you of the joys of weaving, Karen. I can’t believe how the time is flying and how fast the move is coming. I know you looking forward to it, though.

    Thank you for sharing your rag rug process at the WOW meeting. I learned a great deal. I have your handout with my notes to reference when make my next one.

    I have no doubt that you will reach your goal.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Annie, It will take a lot to make me lose my joy in weaving. This tapestry weaving is a true pleasure, and when I’m at the loom I lose track of time and everything else. Unless something totally unexpected happens, I’m sure to meet my goal.

      I’m happy to hear you benefitted from the rag rug demo. I hope I get to see your next rag rug!

      Thanks friend,
      Karen

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