Tried and True: Organized Reeds

My weaving history includes very fine threads all the way to heavy-duty rug warps. As a result, I have acquired a wide selection of reeds over time. All five of my looms have beaters that will accommodate any length or height of reed. When I plan a project, one of the first things I consider is whether I have the size reed that is needed. To keep my reeds organized, I need two things. One, a simple method to manage the reeds I have, tracking the reeds as they go in and out of use. Two, a place to store all the reeds, arranged in order by dents per cm and dents per inch.

Reed Organization

  • Reed Inventory

I keep a list in my Notes app on my phone with the sizes and lengths of reeds that I have. If a reed is in use, I note which loom. If a reed will be needed for a planned project, I also note that. As soon as I remove a reed from the beater at the end of a project, I put the reed away and update my Reed Inventory list.

Simple system for tracking reeds in and out of use.
Sample Reed Inventory note. When I am planning, I look at the note on my phone to see what reeds I have that are available. “Next” reserves the reed for the loom that needs it next.
  • Reed Holder

Steve created a storage solution for my reeds. The holder goes along the back wall of my drawloom studio for about six feet. Here are the details, using nominal board sizes. The reeds sit on a 1” x 6” board at the base, which is supported against the wall by a 1” x 4” board. The base, with a 1” x 2” lip, sits about 12” off the ground. The reed dividers are 3/8” x 5 3/4” dowels that are sunk into a 1” x 3” board that is attached to the wall, which sets the dowels about 27” above the base.

DIY Reed Holder behind my drawloom.
Reed holder is fastened to the wall behind the drawloom. (Notice that the drawloom rag rug warp has come over the back beam…)
Organized reeds!
The dowels are placed at a height that will hold even my shortest reeds.
Reed holder stores weaving loom reeds. DIY
Reeds are in order by dent size. Metric reeds are separate from those with dents per inch.

If you would like a PDF copy of Steve’s diagram that shows all the dimensions, click HERE to send me an email request.

May you have a place for everything, and everything in it’s place.

Yours,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Geri Rickard says:

    That handy husband of yours! What a nice solution, and I like the pegboard with hanging lams, etc. very nice,

  • Marianne says:

    Thanks for sharing! Weaving requires so much paraphernalia so i am always curious how other weavers organize their studios. Thank you you for inviting us into yours!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marianne, Yes, paraphernalia is a good description of all the tools and supplies needed for weaving. Learning ways to organize things seems to be a requirement for weaving.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Betsy says:

    Ha! In the first picture of the storage rack, I thought it was attached to the wall at an angle, with the shortest reeds on the right. Nice optical illusion. And very nice storage solution.

  • Elisabeth says:

    Very neat idea! I agree, it’s so helpful to have a good system for storing tools and accessories. Thank you for sharing!
    Elisabeth

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, It’s much more relaxing to have everything in its place. And it saves money because I’m not buying duplicates of things I already have, but couldn’t find.

      Thanks!
      Karen

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Tools Day: Reading Swedish

Through my exploration of Swedish weaving techniques, I have acquired several Swedish weaving books. Fortunately, I also found a Swedish-English weaving glossary with pages and pages of translated words. Looking up a word at a time, I slowly made my way through small portions of the books. And then I discovered Google Translate, an app for my iPhone!

A few of my favorite Swedish weaving books.

Ever-expanding library of Swedish weaving books.

Google Translate allows me to type Swedish words or phrases, or try to speak them, and it gives me an English translation in return. The app also allows me to hold the phone’s camera over printed words, and the translation shows on the phone’s screen.

Using Google Translate to read Swedish weaving books.

Multiple ways to enter text for translation. Translations give a general idea of the subject matter, even though some of the wording may be unclear.

I’m the first to admit that Google is unfamiliar with standard weaving terms, and the results can be humorous. “Varp” might be translated as “Puppy,” “Inslag” as “Element,” and “Sked” as “Spoon.” But “Warp,” “Weft,” and “Reed” are easy to understand because of their placement in the instructions. Shouldn’t Google brush up on vocabulary for handweavers? Overall, the Google Translate app is a useful tool for understanding the basics of a Swedish draft and instructions.

Using Google Translate to read Swedish weaving books.

Book titles in Swedish, as seen through the iPhone camera in the Google Translate app.

Using Google Translate to read Swedish weaving books.

Through the app, the Swedish words are seen as translated into English.

Now, all I need are a few more Swedish weaving books!

May you overcome a language barrier.

Vävglädje (Happy Weaving),
Karen

11 Comments

  • Pia says:

    Well, even though I speak Swedish, today I learned the word åkläde, which is a blanket made from two pieces sewn together in layers. 🙂

    That’s a very clever app!

  • Betsy says:

    Back in the dark ages I wanted to go to a college that taught Swedish (assuming that a language was required). My grandparents were Swedish and spoke it in the home. Unfortunately the only college that did and also offered my major was in California. I lived in CT and there was no way my parents were going to let me go that far.

    Wonder if that school also taught weaving? 🙂

    Google Translate is awesome. I didn’t know there was an app!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Betsy, It’s not hard to imagine that you were interested in learning Swedish at that age, since you had grandparents who spoke Swedish.
      I could have taken weaving classes at my university, but I was in the music world at the time, and hadn’t yet been exposed to the world of weaving. Oh, the what ifs…

      Karen

  • Anonymous says:

    Have you seen the book lists on some of the Scandinavian Weaving groups? Sara Von Treskow kindly put up an exhaustive list of the books in her personal library and a very nice Swedish weaver, whose name escapes me this early in the morning, did another very good one. They’re worth finding and make great shopping lists.

  • Kat says:

    I don’t know about the app, but on the google translate website you can help by contributing better translations. A lot of it relies on context so if you (and other weavers here) update the weaving words in weaving contexts it will learn!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Kat, I didn’t know that about Google Translate. I can’t find anything on the app that lets you contribute better translations, but that’s great that the website takes that kind of input. We could really get a good Swedish-English weaving glossary at our fingertips!

      Karen

  • Marjorie says:

    You have quite a fan club on Facebook! Several people have recommended your blog to me, as I recently purchased a Glimakra Ideal, but haven’t warped it yet because I find it so overwhelming. But I am eager to get started!

    As for Swedish, there is a super neat language learning site called Duolingo that you can learn basic Swedish on, if you’d like to extend your understanding of your books. Google Translate is decent, but as you’ve found, it’s also limited.

    I am learning a great deal from your blog, so thank you for your generosity to new weavers.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Majorie, I wasn’t aware of a fan club. Haha. That’s cool. It gives me joy to hear that I am helping other people, especially new weavers!

      I know it can feel overwhelming to warp the Ideal the first time, but if you have the steps to follow, you’ll do just fine. It’s pretty exciting once you get going.

      I checked the Duolingo site. It looks great. Thanks for the tip!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

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Tools Day: These 6 Apps Are Great for Weavers!

I love mixing new technology with the old, passed-down tradition of handweaving. My iPhone has become a regular accessory in my daily routines. Since my iPhone is usually in my back pocket, the ease of using apps as weaving tools makes a lot of sense. (These apps are useful, even if you are not a weaver.)

Here are my favorite apps for weaving and how I use them:

Things gives me a simple way to organize my daily activities and responsibilities. I especially like the way I can break down a weaving project into parts or steps.

Things - iPhone App useful for weavers

Kitchen Calculator makes conversions between metric and imperial units super easy. I use it to convert weight units and length units of thread and yarn.

Kitchen Calculator app - useful for weavers

WolframAlpha is my go-to app for more complicated calculations, such as when I want to convert two numbers in an equation. Some websites list yarn in grams/yards, which makes no sense to me. This app does the heavy-lifting math so my brain can save itself for more creative work.

WolframAlpha app - useful for weavers

My Library keeps a list of all the books in my weaving library. This certainly helps keep me from duplicating purchases. The books are organized by category in the app, so I have them arranged the same way on my bookshelf, making it easy to find a particular book.

My Library - app that keeps a list of my weaving books

OfficeTime – Time and Expense Tracking makes it easy to track the time for every phase of a weaving project. I can also set a dollar amount per hour, so I can see the cost of labor at a glance.

OfficeTime - iPhone app useful for weavers wanting to track time and expenses

Google Translate helps me make sense of my stack of Swedish weaving books. I type Swedish words and it translates back to me in English. Usually the translation is not quite right, but close enough that I can understand what it means.

Google Translate - iPhone app useful for understanding Swedish weaving books.

Have you found apps that are useful for weaving? Please tell about them in the comments!

May you reach a new level of efficiency that makes room for even more creativity.

Thankful,
Karen

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