Combination Drawloom – Simple and Engaging

I am constantly improving my methods of operating the drawloom. I pull and release draw handles and draw cords, check for errors, and throw the shuttle for each unit of threads (six times per unit with the current setup). Everything is in order. And, while I’m actively absorbed with this mental and physical choreography, I experience freedom from every other care.

Hem of towel is bleached 16/1 linen weft, and then green 16/2 linen weft. The pattern area of the towel is woven with royal blue 16/1 linen weft.
Solid row of pattern across the warp requires that all pattern shaft draw handles are pulled. It always seems thrilling to me to see all the handles down at once!
Lower border of the towel is the easy part. Pattern shafts are used for making a repeated pattern, and no single unit cords are involved.
Pattern shaft draw handles are now relegated to the side borders. The center body of the towel uses single unit draw cords to create non-repeated pattern. The single units give me freedom to design a (planned) random snowfall expression.
Snowflake Towel 01 is wrapping around the cloth beam. Snowflake Towel 02 is going over the knee beam. Snowflake Towel 03 is being woven. Snowflake Towel 04 will be the final towel on this warp. (But, who knows what I’ll be able to weave after that to the very end of the warp?)

These snowflake patterns are delightful to weave. There is enough consistency with the border pattern shafts to make it simple. And there is enough (planned) random snowflakes using single units and pattern shafts to keep it engaging. All I have to do is follow the graphed chart. As I weave, the snowflakes emerge, as if by magic. But it’s not really magic, is it?

Standard procedure is to always have a temple in place. I have rubber bands on the first and last draw handles for the side border pattern, and on the center handle for the border pattern (not pulled in this photo).
Everything works together! …for the good of the fabric being woven.
Sometimes one single unit is enough to make the next row of pattern.
I keep the chart at eye level and constantly refer to it. Closely following the chart is the only way I can hope to weave something worthwhile on the combination drawloom.

If you believe in Jesus you must walk with him. And as you do, you come to know the truth. Truth is found by walking in it. The pattern on the chart is true, and gives direction. The delight comes as we see the real-time results emerge in our own hearts. That’s freedom in its purest form.

May your search for truth bring freedom.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

8 thoughts on “Combination Drawloom – Simple and Engaging

    1. Thank you, Beth. I know it appears complicated, but it doesn’t take long to see how everything works. This is my entertainment, so I like figuring it out.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  1. Wow! The snowflake pattern will be enjoyed for generations! Thanks for a lovely, surprising post. Your work invokes joy and delight. God bless you.

    1. Hi Vivian, These towels will be heirlooms, hopefully, and well used. I’m looking forward to Christmas already, when these will be hanging in our home.

      Thank you so much,
      Karen

  2. Hi Karen, Do you have a recommendation(s) for a beginner who is interested in the Drawloom weaving but has no clue what and how it works – reading material with pictures and explanations and word definitions?

    As always your message comes through, blessings

    1. Hi Linda, The book that is perfect for exploring the possibilities with a drawloom is “Drawloom Weaving,” by Joanne Hall. Also, if you are ever in the vicinity of Joanne teaching a drawloom class, I would recommend going.

      Thanks,
      Karen

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