One More Swedish Art Weaves Bag

A warp is finished when the woven cloth has been taken to completion. At that point, the loom is free for a new warp. That is the rule I’ve given myself. If I ignore the rule and put on a new warp before its time, the unfinished cloth has a way of staying unfinished for too long.

Joanne Hall's Swedish Art Weaves workshop in San Antonio, Texas.
Ready to pack up after the Swedish Art Weaves workshop and take my loom back home. The Joanne Hall workshop was sponsored by the enthusiastic San Antonio Handweavers Guild a few months ago.
Monksbelt woven with pick-up.
Monksbelt pattern continued at home.
Swedish art weaves - dukagång.
Woven from the back, this dukagång pattern came from a Swedish publication I borrowed from the San Antonio Handweavers Guild library.
Weaving krabbasnår and other Swedish art weaves.
Krabbasnår, just behind the fell line, is from a pattern in Heirlooms of Skåne, Weaving Techniques, by Gunvor Johansson.

Thanks to that completion rule, I have a new bag. This fabric includes the various patterns that I wove in Joanne Hall’s workshop on Swedish Art Weaves several months ago. You will also see that I explored some patterns on my own at home. I gained two excellent outcomes from this finishing pursuit—a new bag to use, and a loom that is free for the next warp! (See the first bag here: Monksbelt Flowers on a Shoulder Bag)

Making a bag from Swedish art weaves.
Side piece, krabbasnår, is hand-stitched in place. From the top of the bag to the bottom – krabbasnår (krabba), rölakan, halvkrabba, dukagång, munkabälte (monksbelt), each section separated by plain weave stripe variations.
Handwoven bag made from Swedish art weaves.
On this side of the finished bag, from top to bottom – halvkrabba, dukagång, munkabälte. I made the hard decision to take out a section of rölakan I had woven in order to be able to put the knots from the linen warp at the top of the bag.
Handwoven bag made from Swedish art weaves.
Bag is lined and has pockets, and has a magnetic snap closure. The 6/2 Tuna wool shoulder strap was woven on my Glimåkra band loom.
Handwoven Swedish art weaves bag just finished. Now, on to the next warp!
Now, on to the next warp!

Left to myself, I’d rather do what I want. I’d rather start a new project than bring an “old” one to completion. I’m glad my Lord is faithful with me. He completes the work that he began. The Good Shepherd tends his sheep. He leads us to the still waters of peaceful perseverance, saving us from the regret of going our own way. And we have his perfect outcome to look forward to.

May you resist doing what you’d rather do.

With you,
Karen

14 Comments

  • Beth says:

    Wow! You never cease to amaze me, Karen. It’s lovely!

  • Karen says:

    Absolutely lovely…so colorful and lively. I just love this!

  • Joanne Hall says:

    Hi Karen, what a great bag you have made. I think you will have fun using it. It is so colorful and playful. Thanks for sharing this. I have a few samplers that I could make into more bags.
    Joanne

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joanne, I think this will become a favorite bag to use for special occasions. Every time I look at it I’m reminded of how much fun we had in that workshop! Making a bag is a great way to use a sampler.

      Thanks so much,
      Karen

  • Denise Schryver says:

    Very beautiful Karen!
    Our guild had a Swedish art weaves workshop with Joanne scheduled but was cancelled due to covid. I may have to try on my own after seeing your lovely work!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Denise, I hope you do give these beautiful weaves a try. The Väv 2/2013 issue has very good instructions, as well as the book I mentioned in the post. Nothing beats being taught by Joanne in person; however, you can still do it on your own. And hopefully after things get back to normal, your guild will have Joanne come then.

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Good morning Karen,

    Basis the condition of both our homes as we push through transition to retirement, I’ve been deaf to God’s direction for a long time.

    One hour home repairs finally done.

    Long forgotten ‘ must make ‘ textile projects rediscovered in a mystery bag stuffed in a basement box.

    Projects started by beloved long gone, and never finished.

    Love your posting.

    Nannette

  • Linda Adamson says:

    Love your “bag” which I would call a work of art. Thanks for sharing your posts. God Bless!!!

  • Elisabeth says:

    Beautiful, and great use of the Swedish art weave fabric!
    And I really like that rule, I don’t think we were meant to procrastinate 🙂

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, Things go better if we don’t procrastinate. I’ve had to relearn that more than a few times. The Swedish art weaves are so beautiful, so it’s nice to have a way to show them off.

      Thank you,
      Karen

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