Transferring Warp Ends Takes Courage

There are four pairs of overlapping warp chains, with stripes to line up. I created a mess. A few options to consider: 1. Give up. 2. Weave it as is, destroying the design. 3. Use two sets of lease sticks, and expect problems with threading (2,064 ends). 4. Transfer all ends to a single set of lease sticks, arranging threads in order for each stripe.

Eight warp chains...to correct a huge winding error.

Each of four warp chains were duplicated when I realized I had wound only half the correct number of ends in each chain.

Option 4 seems the riskiest. If I lose the cross while transferring threads, I have an even bigger mess. It’s all or nothing. Go for it! Fortunately, my apprentice, Juliana, arrives in the nick of time to give me a hand.

Transferring color stripes to one set of lease sticks.

Lease cross is tied separately for each color “partial” stripe.

Transferring two warp chains to a single set of lease sticks.

Stripes from the two warp chains are transferred to a single set of lease sticks. Now the stripe colors are at their full correct width.

Preparing to transfer warp ends.

For the four center warp chains, each section of color is separated and tied at the cross. It takes an extra set of hands to transfer them in order to the primary set of lease sticks.

Delicate transfer of warp ends accomplished!

All warp ends are now successfully transferred to a single set of lease sticks. Let the loom dressing begin!

It worked! All the threads are successfully transferred to one pair of lease sticks. What a relief! I can beam the warp knowing that all is well. A beautiful double weave throw is imminent.

Pre-sleying the reed at the loom.

Warp is pre-sleyed at the loom. So far, so good.

Double weave warp ready to beam!

Ready to beam! Looking forward to this dressing and weaving experience.

We all have made a mess of our lives, and we know it. We hear of options to fix things, but one seems the riskiest: Transfer everything to God. But what if I mess that up, too? There’s good news. God transfers us. When we place our trust in Jesus Christ, God transfers us from our messy state to his good order. And the result is a weaving that showcases his workmanship—a beautiful you.

May you take a worthy risk.

With you,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Glad this worked! Even more happy that God works messes out for us! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joyce, It is a relief when we see things begin to work out! And what a relief it is to trust our great Lord with the most important things in life.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie Lancaster says:

    I like this thought.

    And so glad the mess worked out. But I knew quitting was never an option for you, Karen!

    • Karen says:

      Annie, You are right. Quitting was a thought that flickered for a moment, but I never really considered it an option. You may know me a little to well. 😉

      Karen

  • D’Anne says:

    I know that was frustrating, Karen. Been there, done that, although with a smaller warp. Perseverance pays offf!

    • Karen says:

      D’Anne, That is so true! Perseverance does pay off! I think that is something that has been a part of me since childhood – quiet perseverance. Thanks for making me stop and reflect on that for a moment.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Linda says:

    God does fix our messes in unexpected ways. …. when we ask. And I thought 398 ends of only two colors were a challenge! Perspective and perseverance are helpful tools.

    Thank you for sharing your faith!

    Linda

    • Karen says:

      Hi Linda, It is crucial for us to have the humility to ask God for help out of our messes. Perspective and perseverance are indispensable!

      Thanks!
      Karen

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Wild Linen Rya

Rya knots and loops of threads look chaotic at first. These linen rya knots will never be tame, but that’s to be expected. Linen butterflies have created a swath of wild rya “flowers” planted in a smooth linen “lawn.”

Making rya knots with a bundle of linen threads.

Continuous weft bundle forms loops between rya knots.

Linen rya knots.

Loops are clipped. Green butterfly is for the background plain weave weft.

Each section of rya starts with a butterfly made of several strands of linen in assorted weights and colors. I tie each rya knot on a pair of warp ends, leaving a loop between knots. There are two to three passes of plain weave between each row of knots. When I finish a butterfly, I go back and clip all the loops. After the loops are cut, I trim the tops of the threads to even out the rya “flower garden.”

Linen rya knots on a linen weft-faced background.

Tops of the rya threads are trimmed. I intentionally leave a few shorter and longer threads, for interest.

Linen rya knots on a weft-faced linen background. Tapestry/inlay sampler.

Linen rya knots on a weft-faced linen background. Wild linen “flowers” growing out of a smooth linen “lawn.”

When things around us look a mess and don’t make sense, full of knots and loops, there is one thing we must do. Keep holding on to faith. Fight to keep your faith strong. Faith in Christ Jesus will carry you through uncertainty and will reveal the first ray of hope. The loops will be clipped, the threads will be trimmed. A garden of color will emerge. Faith waits for that.

May your faith be strong.

All the best,
Karen

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Small Tapestry Front and Back

My small tapestries are a mess of threads on the back. I weave from the back, so I get used to seeing the mess. I admire the tapestry weavers who sew all the weft tails in. Front and back, the tapestry is finished and clean. So, I am sewing in the weft tails on this little Lucia patch.

Back of tapestry, sewing in weft tails.

Sewing in weft tails, one thread at a time. Threaded on a needle, weft tail is sewn through the back of an adjacent ridge, and then the tail is clipped off close to the surface of the weaving.

Back of small tapestry, stitching in weft tails.

When completed, the back is as finished as the front.

Lucia, woven with my youngest granddaughter in mind.

Lucia, our youngest grandchild, is the reason for this small tapestry. I may need to weave the names of the other four…

Sometimes we hit a patch in life that is filled with a mess of troubles. Take troubles to the Lord. He hears when we call. The Lord answers every little prayer. Each little trouble is taken care of, step by step. When the finished tapestry is revealed, we see that He knows our name. And a bit of every one of the messy threads is woven into our back story. Front and back, the tapestry is finished and clean.

May you be known by name.

Yours truly,
Karen

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Plain Weave in a Fancy Mess

Plain weave has never been this interesting! I am painting and stamping the warp on the loom. Imagine applying colors onto the warp between the shafts and the beater! Weaving on the printed warp produces lovely subdued woven images. And, I had forgotten how fast two treadles and one shuttle can be. After having slowly woven many rag rugs, plain weave feels like a speedboat ride now.

Stamped warp between shafts and beater.

Stamped warp between shafts and the beater, waiting to dry.

The only problem is, I don’t like the mess. Paint is messy, and I am not fond of getting my hands dirty. Yes, I wear gloves when painting, but there’s the sink, the carpet, and the loom to think about, too. No, I don’t like the mess.

Painting and stamping warp on the loom.

Tarps and drop cloths cover the carpet and some of the loom in case of paint spills. Paper towels stand ready for emergencies.

Stamped warp being woven.

When dry, the printed area comes through the beater as the warp is advanced.

Weaving a warp that is painted on the loom.

Stamped shapes become subdued as the weft goes across.

Have you ever been in a mess in life? I have. Others see the pretty fabric you produce, but never see the mess behind the scenes. Appeal to the one who can help. There is one who sees the mess, but loves us anyway. When we appeal to God as Shepherd, we acknowledge our need, and that we want him to lead us–even through the mess. Then, the fabric that is produced has beauty that is truly woven in.

May you enjoy creating beauty, despite the mess.

In process,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Loyanne says:

    Such a beautiful message is so many ways. Thank you.

  • It sounded like you painted the warp after it was on the loom? Is that correct? I have always painted the warp before it was put on the loom. You can control the mess a little bit.

    Happy Weaving,

    Kate

    • Karen says:

      You’re right, Kate. Painting the warp before it is on the loom is probably more practical, and certainly more common. I wanted to stamp the warp, though, and stamping has to be done after the warp is on the loom.

      Karen

  • Lori says:

    Beautiful! I want to try it. What type of paint do you use? How is the fabric finished or washed?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Lori,
      I’m glad you like it! I used Tulip fabric paints that I bought at Hobby Lobby. They were easy to work with, but I did have to thin them a little with water, which weakened the color. I machine washed the fabric in hot water and dried it in a hot dryer. I wanted the fabric to soften up as much as possible, which it did. Unfortunately, some color was lost in the hot water. If I were to do this again, I would research other yarn and fabric dyes that would probably have better staying power. On the other hand, I think those fancy dyes would mean more of a mess… 🙂

      Karen

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