Handwoven Blankets for Babies

Handwoven baby blankets are for cuddling babies. It is a pleasure to weave a baby blanket for a dear friend’s first grandchild. As long as I’m dressing the loom, it makes sense to weave more than one. So the second baby blanket is for cuddling my own grand-babies when they come to visit.

Double weave baby blankets. Cutting off!
Double weave baby blankets unrolled from the cloth beam, ready to be cut off.
Hemming double weave baby blanket.
Double weave top and bottom layers are stitched together by hand at the hems. Contrasting thread is used for a decorative embroidered look.
Embroidered edge of handwoven baby blanket.
Whipstitch in contrasting thread.
Handwoven baby blankets super soft for baby's skin.
Blankets are triple washed for softness. Ready to touch baby’s skin.
Double weave baby blanket.
Double weave has reverse pattern on the back.
Double weave baby blanket.
Same warp, different weft.
Handwoven baby blanket for newborn.
Meet Julian, my friend’s new grandson, wrapped in love.
Handwoven baby blanket. (Resting on his great-great-grandmother's quilt.)
Meet Benjamin, our newest grandson, wrapped in love. (Resting on his great-great-grandmother’s quilt.)

A resting baby is a picture of hope. Hope for the next feeding, hope in the mother’s tender love, hope in the father’s secure arms. No arrogance, no illusion of grandeur. Just quiet rest. Hope in the Lord looks like this. Hope for today, the future, and forever. My soul is at rest—in complete rest and trust. Like a resting baby in his mother’s arms. Like a baby wrapped in a blanket woven especially for him.

May you find rest.

Blessed,
Karen

Quiet Friday: Woven Baby Wrap Baby

A new life in the family is cause for celebration and thanksgiving! I had the privilege of weaving a baby wrap while my daughter carried the new little life inside of her. A wrap being woven to hold Lucia, and a baby being woven in the womb. Beautiful and more beautiful. God’s blessings on Eddie and Melody as they love the gift they have been given.

Handwoven baby wrap holding new baby.
Handwoven baby wrap with baby Lucia. Photo credit: Eddie Fernandez (Lucia’s daddy)

 

 

Woven baby wrap, handwoven by the baby's grandmother.
In her mother’s arms… Photo Credit: Eddie Fernandez (Lucia’s daddy)

May you love and be loved.

Affectionately,
Lola (Grandma)

Tapestry While Waiting

Do you remember the baby wrap I was weaving for my daughter and her coming baby? Baby Lucia has arrived! And she is already capturing our hearts. I was glad to have a small tapestry to keep my hands busy while waiting her arrival.

Weaving from the back on small travel tapestry frame loom.
Weaving from the back on my small travel tapestry frame loom.
Tapestry spelling out grandbaby's name - Lucia.
Weaving letters to spell the name of our new grandbaby, Lucia. L – U – …

Observing a newborn infant is observing pure trust. She completely depends on her mommy and daddy.

First Day
New baby and new mother. Trust and deep affection.

It will take days and years for Lucia to know her parents and learn to understand their deep love for her. Oh, to have the heart of a child. Trust in the Lord. Simply trust.

Infant's first day.

May you rest as you trust.

Love,
Lola (Grandma)

Quiet Friday: Small Tapestry Bridge

The unfinished small tapestry went in my travel bag this week. Travel tapestry is perfect for those waiting times at the airport; and gives me something interesting to do in flight. Best of all, while visiting my mom, she and I sat side-by-side one afternoon “doing art.” Mom used Staedtler coloring pencils to color detailed flower designs in a fancy coloring book; and I used Fårö wool to weave colors in the tapestry. What a sweet setting in which to finish this tapestry bridge!

Planning small tapestry.

Under the cartoon of small tapestry.

Beginning of small tapestry.

Tapestry while traveling.

Bridge takes shape in small tapestry.

Small tapestry - weaving from the back.

Weaving from the back. Small Tapestry.

Progress on small tapestry Bridge scene.

Small tapestry - Bridge scene, nearing completion.

Building a bridge. Small tapestry.

Small tapestry - bridge nearing completion.

Small tapestry Bridge, finishing touches.

Bridge small tapestry.

May all your travels be pleasant.

Happy weaving,
Karen

Conversation with Teresa Loveless of Weaving Southwest

Weaving Southwest has a vibrant history in northern New Mexico that has influenced weaving traditions far and wide. I recently took advantage of this treasure trove of experience in a class taught by Teresa Loveless, the granddaughter of Weaving Southwest pioneer, Rachel Brown. I hoped to sharpen my tapestry skills by learning a fresh approach, and I was not disappointed! Teresa’s attentive teaching style brims with encouragement, making every student exceed their own expectations.

Weaving Southwest in Arroyo Seco, New Mexico
Weaving Southwest in Arroyo Seco, New Mexico.
Weaving Southwest student accomplishments.
Teresa Loveless on the right with her five happy students from the class “Habitat, A Study in Verticals.”

Join me as I sit with Teresa in the park across from the shop to talk about her dreams and aspirations…

Fast forward twenty years. What would you like to be known for?

I have an interest in preservation of culture, and seeing that carried out through textiles. Preserving culture through textiles worldwide is a hidden passion of mine, and I’m working on ways to make that happen.

This sounds like a big dream.

Yes, it is a big dream that I have given a lot of thought to. With modern technology there is great potential. Technology makes it possible to pick out every little niche of fiber in the world and pull it all together in a classy and educational way.

What can be done to preserve cultures through textiles?

You could go to little villages or communities, and through today’s technology, bring them all together and preserve entire cultures. In Before They Pass Away, photographer Jimmy Nelson documents some of the most secluded tribes in the world. And he put them together in an incredible photo book, with their beautiful textiles draping all over them. That book was part of the inspiration for my dream.

Your grandmother taught you how to weave; and your mother taught you jewelry making. And now you are passing weaving on to your very young daughter. What are your thoughts about people passing what they know on to their children and grandchildren?

I grew up in this family of artists and inventors, and they were weavers and jewelers and everything in between, and I did it all. I wove and I made jewelry. It was normal. It was my life. When I went away and realized that not everyone brought their loom to college, or that making a silver ring is not something everybody can do… that was eye opening.

For me, it is all about passing it along. Teach your kids to do what you do. Even if they think they’re going to go off and do something else. I was going to go be a scientist. And then I came back. Clearly, I’m not a scientist. I’m a weaver.

Because it was passed on through my family, and because of my incredible grandmother, I am able to help preserve culture. I am helping to preserve beauty through textiles.

What about your daughter, do you think she will become a weaver?

Pass on the tradition, pass on the skill, and pass on, hopefully, the love for it. But my daughter loves bugs more than she likes yarn right now, so maybe she’ll be the scientist, who knows?

Weaving Southwest in New Mexico
Weaving Southwest pickup truck depicts the down-to-earth approach of the shop. Highly accomplished, yet unpretentious.

Tell me about your sweet spot. Are there times when you think, “I was made for this?”

I’m doing it here, like the class we just finished. I love teaching. I love being able to share what I know, what was passed on to me. It doesn’t matter how much someone knows or doesn’t know when they come. From afar, weaving does look a little confusing, but if you get the feel of it, if you understand the warp and weft and structure… Oh, the things you can do!

You enjoy simplifying things for people, don’t you?

That’s it, definitely! It doesn’t have to be hard. There are all sorts of technical terms, but weaving does not have to be difficult. Seeing people blossom, from, “Oh my gosh, which is warp, which is weft?” Or, “Do I do a single dovetail here?,” to realizing you can do a single dovetail wherever you want, …but you don’t have to. There are so many options. If you go into it with confidence you’re going to be able to produce incredible work!

You seem happy to see your students flourish…

Oh, yes. When I see my students happy, then I’m happy!

Thank you for taking time with me. It has been fun to get to know you more!

Absolutely! Thanks!

Study in verticals from class at Weaving Southwest in NM.
This study in verticals is hung horizontally just above the work table in my weaving studio. Makes me smile.

May you dream big.

Very happy weaving,
Karen