Weaving Ideas – Year in Review Video

Everything starts with an idea. And some of those ideas become tangible expressions of dreams come true. Who knew that a simple idea in 2012 would lead to a seven-year exploration of weaving through The Big Book of Weaving? (See Weaving through The Big Book.) Who knew that weaving on a drawloom in 2016 at Homestead Fiber Crafts would plant the idea of weaving on a drawloom of my own? (see Quiet Friday: Day at the Drawloom.) And who knew that an idea in 2013 to write about my weaving journey, calling it Warped for Good, would bring friends like you to come and enjoy the journey with me? For these things and so much more, I am truly grateful.

Siblings Tapestry is 3 cm away from completion!
Siblings Tapestry is three centimeters away from completion.
Drawloom rag rug - single-unit.
Single-unit drawloom rag rug is ten centimeters into testing everything–draw cords, sheds, shuttles. After a few more adjustments the actual rag rug weaving will commence.

Your ideas are priceless. That’s because you are priceless. You were made in God’s image, with the ability to imagine wonderful intricacies through creative thinking. In fact, you began as God’s idea. As we walk with him, we become the tangible expression of his dream come true.

Grab a cup of coffee or tea and sit here with me to reminisce over the past weaving year.

May this year bring your best ideas ever.

For you,
Karen

16 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Karen: You are such an awesome servant and ambassador for God! Your comments have always captured my attention, but this one really spoke to me! I even wrote your words down to read to a friend who has a birthday today. I respect and admired your creativity and the effort you invest in sharing! It all takes time and effort, but I can see that your heart is in what you do…and your heart belongs to God. May God continue to bless you in this year of 2020! 🙂

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joyce, It’s a pleasure to be able to share what I enjoy. Thanks for your thoughtful words. I’m glad to have you along with me.

      Happy weaving new year,
      Karen

  • Joanne Hall says:

    It was fun to see all that you have done this past year. And I enjoyed seeing that photo of our winter drawloom class and the samplers on the drawlooms. You have done a lot of weaving already in your new home. I look forward to what you weave after our art weaves workshop next month. See you then.
    Joanne

    • Karen says:

      Hi Joanne, That drawloom class was a highlight for the year. I’m thankful to be in a place and season of life that suits my weaving endeavors.

      I am looking forward to the art weaves class. I still have so much to learn!

      See you soon,
      Karen

  • Cynthia H. says:

    Karen, what an amazing artist you are, beautiful work. Cant wait to see what you will be working on next. Say hi to Steve for me. Cynthia H.

  • lanora dodson says:

    This was inspiring on SO many levels! It brought a sense of peace, wonder, and excitement all at the same time. Thank you for sharing and cannot wait for the coming year to see what you’ll be creating!

  • Nannette says:

    Karen,
    Thank you for sharing!
    I will need to watch the video a 4 or 8 or 10 more times to absorb everything you did in 2019.
    The close ups are welcome.
    Nannette

  • Beth Mullins says:

    You’ve had a beautiful, productive year! You and your work are so inspiring, bringing excitement, curiosity, and clam all at the same time. I can’t wait to see the siblings completed and what’s to come in 2020.

    Happy New Year, Karen!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth, It’s good to have a sense of accomplishment. I always enjoy seeing your beautiful woven creations on IG. We both had a year rich with weaving. I’m glad to have your friendship on this journey.

      Happy New Weaving Year,
      Karen

  • Johanna McGuirk says:

    Dear Karen

    I am very keen to get the details for the electric bobbin winder as I am frustrated using the hand drill. Would it be possible to supply me with more details please? Hopefully my husband or son can put one together for me.
    Kind regards
    Johanna

    • Karen says:

      Hi Johanna, I am happy to share the details for the electric bobbin winder that Steve made for me.

      I will send you an email with the information.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Karen, thank you so much for sharing your video. It was both inspiring and calming. A beautiful expression of pure creativity expressed through our traditional craft. Love your work.
    Barbara

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Single-Unit Boldness

Doing something bold is a dramatic way to end the year. I have added 200 single-unit draw cords to the drawloom. The bold thing is that I am using lanyard clips. This changes the usual process of setting up the draw cords, so I’m making some of it up as I go.

First, I sleyed the cords through the single-unit reed (used for spacing the draw cords). Next, I put a one-inch lanyard clip on every lift heddle. Now, one at a time, in order, I attach a lift heddle to a pattern unit, and then clip the lift heddle to the draw cord. Repeat 200 times. (I picked up the clever tip about lanyard clips online from Su Butler, who has, admittedly, a different type of drawloom setup than what I have.)

When this drawloom rag rug project is finished, I should be able to unclip the draw cords from the pattern units, leave the draw cords in place on the loom, and start fresh for the next project. Progress through the new year will reveal whether this bold action is a good idea…or not.

Journey in Pictures:

Setting up single-unit draw cords.
Setting up single-unit draw cords.
Setting up single-unit draw cords on the drawloom.
Getting set up for the drawloom.
Lift heddles and lanyard clips.
Lift heddles for the single-unit drawloom.
Attaching lift heddles to single-unit draw cords.
Single-unit reed is sleyed.
Lanyard clips on the drawloom. Process pics.
Placing the single-unit reed on the drawloom.
Pattern heddles in position. Drawloom process pics.
Setting up single-unit draw cords.
Drawloom almost ready for weaving! Process pics.

May you take a bold step into the new year.

In with the new,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Charlotte says:

    Previously, I have used those extra large paper clips. But! Even I forgot that tip when setting up my single unit, this time. The lanyard clips are brilliant. I must find some and on the next warp…apply!!!!! Great move toward saving those single unit cords in a permanent place.

    Staying connected…by His grace…my love to you…

    • Karen says:

      Hi Charlotte, I started out trying paper clips, but I was concerned that they might catch on the threads, so I switched to the lanyard clips. I got 200 lanyard clips on Amazon for less than $5. I’m excited to get started weaving on this!

      Love,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    WOW!
    There is a lot to the draw loom. Your tutorials have brought me to comprehension of the basics.
    Thank you.
    Nannette

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, I know it looks complicated, but it’s just a matter of taking a step at a time. I’m happy to have you following along!

      Happy New Year,
      Karen

  • Marie Kulchinski says:

    Karen
    This is a lot to think about. I have an Oxaback combination loom. I have always used it a shaft draw. I want to convert it to a single unit. I have simple questions.
    1. What are you using for draw cords. On my old Glimarka; I used replace cord for cloth blinds which I got from a upholster fabric store. What type of cord are you using.
    2. You placed the lanyard clipson to a heddle. How did you connect the heddle to the long eye heddle units? I don’t see a knot. I have some idea.
    3 How long are the single eyed heddles/?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marie,
      1. I am using the Texsolv draw cords that came with the Myrehed combination attachment. They come on a roll and are pre-measured. I cut them apart and seared the ends.
      2. The lanyard clip is on the lift heddle, and the lift heddle goes through the top of the pattern heddles and loops through itself. No knot.
      3. I’m not sure which heddles you are asking about. I’m away from home at the moment, but I can measure them Later and let you know.

      Weaving with the single unit capabilities is going to be so much fun!

      Karen

  • Kevin says:

    Thank you for such great information and pictures! I recently acquired a new to me drawloom and am so excited to jump into this!

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Looms Quietly Waiting

Merry Christmas Eve to you. Looms are quietly waiting to resume their rhythm. Meanwhile, songs of joy and hope fill the air because the Savior of the world is born.

Pictorial tapestry on Glimakra Standard loom. Only 6 cm remaining.
1. The Standard
Pictorial tapestry, with only 6 centimeters of the cartoon remaining.
Rosepath rag rug completed on the Glimakra Ideal loom.
2. The Ideal
Second rosepath rag rug completed. Two short rugs yet to be woven on this warp.
Wool handwoven scarves.
3. The Little Loom
First of two scarves is started. I am using the Stardust draft by Mona Nielsen, published in Happy Weaving, from Vävmagasinet, but with yarn and colors of my choosing.
Drawloom getting set up for weaving rag rugs with single unit drawloom.
4. The Drawloom
Warp is threaded and tied-on. Single-unit draw cords have been prepared. Next step: Attaching draw cords to pattern units. And then, tie up treadles and start weaving!

May your night be silent and holy, calm and bright.

Happy Holy-days,
Karen

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I Forgot to Tie the Cross

It’s not a good feeling when you discover that you did not tie the lease cross on one of the warp bouts. When you wind a warp, it’s the cross that keeps the ends in proper order. I carefully tie both sides of the cross before removing the bout from the warping reel. This time, though, I inadvertently tied only part of the cross, which is, essentially, not tying the cross at all.

Realigning threads at the cross.
Working from right to left, I separate one pair of ends at a time to try to recreate the proper order of the warp ends. After every few strands, I insert the lease sticks and tie the cross. Fortunately, the bout on the left was tied properly before it left the warping reel.
Ready to pre-sley the reed and beam the warp.
Ready to pre-sley the reed and beam the warp.

I make my best guess to recreate the thread order, inserting the lease sticks little by little. And as I beam the warp there are several twists that threaten the whole process, getting hung up at the reed. But I coax the warp through at a snail’s pace, not forcing anything.

New wool warp being beamed.
I beam the warp and stop frequently to check the yarn for twists on the front side of the reed. No combing my fingers through the warp, which could lead to uneven warp tension. I lightly flick any twist-ups in front of the reed with my fingers to help keep them moving.

Eventually, the warp is successfully beamed. What a relief!

New warp ready for threading.
Now that the warp is beamed, there is no more concern about misaligned ends. The ends are now in the proper order as they appear on the lease sticks.

Things that matter become misaligned when we or those around us mess up. Some of the ensuing twists and conflicts spell disaster. It’s not a good feeling. We start to imagine that we’re alone and forgotten. You are not forgotten. Baby Jesus of the real Christmas story grew to manhood for a clear purpose. He came in pursuit of you and me, gently calling, never forcing, ever loving us, to put our threads back in order again through his cross. What a relief!

May your threads be put in order.

Good Christmas,
Karen

14 Comments

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Tried and True: Outsmart the Rag Rug Weft Tails

What do you do with weft tails on a rag rug? Normally, you wrap the weft tail around the outer warp end and tuck it back into the shed. But what about color changes? If you have several color changes in a row, you can end up with extra bulk on one selvedge or another from those tucked-in tails.

3 Ways to Outsmart Rag Rug Weft Tails

  • TWO PICKS For a two-pick stripe, leave a tail of several inches on the first pick. For the second pick, lay the weft tail from the first pick in the shed. Lay in the second pick, and cut the fabric strip to overlap the weft tail in the shed. This eliminates any extra bulk at the selvedges. (All tails are cut at a steep angle.)
  • CARRY IT When feasible, carry the weft up the side. If a weft is out of play for only one or two rows, do not cut it. When another weft enters the shed, make sure it encircles the idle weft.
  • DISTRIBUTE Whenever possible, avoid tucking in weft tails two picks in a row. Wait, and tuck in the tail on a subsequent pick.

HERE IS AN EXAMPLE:

How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Gray weft ends with weft tail tucked in. White tabby weft tail is not tucked in.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Rosepath pattern weft for a two-pick stripe. Loooooong weft tail.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Tabby weft goes around the rosepath pattern weft, and is tucked in the shed.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Tabby weft comes through the shed and lays over the tucked-in tail.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Tabby weft is beaten in.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Pattern weft is laid in the shed, with tails overlapping near the center of the warp.
Tabby weft is beaten in, and weft tail is tucked in. In the middle of the rosepath medallion the orange print weft is carried up the side until it is used again. For the gray strip that follows the last white tabby pick, the weft tail is tucked in on the second gray pick.
How to outsmart rag rug weft tails!
Rosepath medallion with several color changes.

One more thing. Cut the weft tail extra long if you are tucking it in a row with weft floats, as in rosepath (Like the center pick in this medallion). This helps keep that weft tail from popping out of place. You don’t want those tails to start waving at you.

May you pay attention to the details.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

4 Comments

  • I’ve thought of doing a post like this as a visual for my students. Now I don’t have to! I will just refer them to your beautiful rug!

    One thing you didn’t mention was the single black pick. How I do a single pick is to cut the strip half the width of my other strips. I cut the length a bit longer than twice the width, allowing for the angle and the overlap and tapered ends. I insert it with a stick shuttle leaving both ends hanging out and beat. Both ends then wrap around the end warp or the weft being carried up the side and have the tapered ends overlap somewhere in the center.

    Excellent tutorial!

    Jenny Bellairs

    • Karen says:

      Hi Jenny, Basics like this are always good to review. Thanks for your encouragement!

      Your method for weaving a single pick is excellent, and eliminates another tail at the selvedge.
      I don’t usually take that extra step, though, of cutting a strip half width. So my single picks do have a long tail tucked in.

      Thank you!
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Brilliant! Thank you.

    I’m working on a strip quilt project with an abundance of leftovers. 4″ will be cut down to 1″ widths and woven into the extra rose path warp on the loom.

    A very timely posting.

    Nannette

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