Heddle Shortage

I am well into threading when I realize I neglected to take into account how many heddles I need for this project! I don’t have 2,064 even if I grab all of the heddles from the other loom. This double weave throw project is at a dead end until more heddles appear. I hurriedly place an order for more heddles…

Threading heddles for double weave.

This Glimåkra Standard is one of three looms that share my supply of Texsolv heddles.

Thankfully, the new heddles arrive quickly and the project is alive again.

This is what 1,000 Texsolv heddles looks like!

This is what 1,000 Texsolv heddles looks like! I didn’t want to run out again any time soon.

New Texsolv heddles - 1,000 of them!

Heddles come in bundles of 100, held together with twist ties. WARNING: DO NOT undo the twist ties before you put the heddles on the shaft bars. You’ll be sorry…

Clipping loops on new Texsolv heddles.

Before putting the heddles on the shaft bars, and while they are still tied into bundles, clip the loops at each end.

Clipping Texsolv heddle loops.

I clip the loops on both ends of the heddles. It is easy to move heddles wherever you want if the loops are cut, including repositioning individual heddles. (It is far easier to clip the loops while the heddles are still tied together.)

New heddles on the shaft bars.

There are 100 new heddles on each shaft. The heddles that are not used will be tied up and put away in my heddle box, ready for the next time I need more heddles.

Alive. This is the Easter season when we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. He died, and was made alive again! What makes it even more fantastic is what that means for us. We all have a goodness shortage. And without a source of true goodness, our lifetime self-improvement project is at a dead end. Yet, through faith in the powerful working of God, we are raised with Christ. We are made alive together with him. His true goodness becomes our living source.

New bundles of Texsolv heddles stand ready to be used!

Threading progresses. New bundles of heddles stand ready to be used!

May you be supplied with more than enough.

Happy Easter,
Karen

8 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    Ugh! I can’t wait to see this once you start weaving.

  • Anonymous says:

    Oh!! The hideous heddle shortage. Been there. Good tip not to undo the twist on heddles. Loose heddles have been known to cause insanity. lol

  • Karen Simpson says:

    Easter Blessings to you and your family throughout the year!

  • Shari says:

    You are amazing! You are so generous to share with us! Your words and photographs are so helpful! As inconvenient and frustrating we can feel from making mistakes it is the way we learn for next time! Happy Easter! We have our Sedar tonight.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Shari, I’m always delighted to find out that others are interested in the things I get to share. I feel very fortunate to have people like you to connect with!

      Thank you! And your Sedar will be rich with meaning. Blessings on your special time.

      Love,
      Karen

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Halfway Milestone

Halfway is a milestone when you are threading 2,064 ends. This double weave in two blocks has threading such that I can listen to podcasts without losing my place. It’s a long stretch to the halfway point.

Threading heddles, from right to left.

Threading heddles, going from right to left.

Before threading, I find the center of the warp and the group of ends that are just past center. I drape those ends on the back beam to mark the spot.

Threading 2064 ends. Halfway point is identified.

Center of the warp is identified. The ends just left of center mark the spot.

Threading heddles in my "playhouse" in the loom.

Sitting in my playhouse to thread the heddles. No hurry.

I’m excited to reach halfway in the threading! It’s a turning point. Now, while they are readily accessible, I position all of the shaft-to-lamm cords to hang down, right at the center of the warp where they belong.

Halfway finished threading heddles! Only 1,032 to go. :)

Half of the threading work is done! Only 1,032 ends to go. 🙂

Cords aligned at the center of the warp.

Center of the warp. Good time to align the cords that go from the lower shaft bars to the upper lamms.

Threading heddles for double weave on a Glimakra Standard loom.

Threading for the double weave throw continues, a few minutes here, an hour there, until all the ends are in heddles.

Have you ever reached a turning point in life, and knew it was time to position things? We try to be good and loving. But we’re never as good as we think. And we end up loving only the people we want to love. We have been separated from God. Our misdeeds push us away from him. Easter is resurrection, but before that is the cross of Christ. God so loved us that he closed the separation between us and him with the cross. That’s the turning point he offers to us, to set things right. Our part is to believe.

May you look forward to the second half.

With you,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Joyce Lowder says:

    Beautiful threads, skill to manage them….all from God. He IS the Master Weaver! Thanks for the connection to the Easter message; loved the words, “God so loved us that He closed the separation between us and Him with the cross.” Happy Easter! 🙂

    • Karen says:

      Good morning, Joyce,
      Letting the Master Weaver have his way in our lives is the best way to celebrate Easter.

      Happy Easter to you and yours,
      Karen

  • Beth Mullins says:

    Pretty, rich colors. It’s going to be beautiful!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth, I’m hoping these colors will fit the bill for my daughter-in-law’s request for vibrant colors. I’m looking forward to seeing the woven effect!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Maggie says:

    Thank you,Karen, for this Holy Week reminder and have fun with the last half threading.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Maggie, So much to be thankful for in this Holy Week! I’m looking forward to the relaxing time of completing this threading.

      All the best,
      Karen

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One Treadle Short

I faced a dead end with this six-shaft weave. The draft requires seven treadles in order to include true plain weave. And I do want plain weave for the hems. That is a problem. This loom has only six treadles. So these double binding twill rag rugs were put on hold while I thought about it.

And then I had an idea. What if… I tie the sixth treadle as if it were the seventh treadle, enabling me to weave the plain weave hem. And then, undo the treadle and re-tie it as the sixth treadle for weaving the body of the rug? It works! Essentially, I created seven treadles out of six. What seemed like a dead end became the point of discovering something new.

Changing treadle tie-up to make six treadles into seven.

With this tie-up, the fifth and sixth treadles (counting right to left) are able to weave an even plain weave. The sixth treadle is actually tied up as the seventh treadle, which is only needed for the plain weave hems at the beginning and end of the rug, paired with treadle five. To change the treadle tie-up, the upper and lower lamms for the first and second shafts (counting back to front) need to be switched. That’s all.

Changing treadle tie-up to make six treadles into seven.

Treadle tie-up now follows the draft as written for the first six treadles to produce the twill weave for the body of the rug.

Underneath view of Vavstuga treadle tie-up system. Makes changing tie-ups a breeze.

Under-the-treadle view of the Vävstuga treadle tie-up system. This tie-up system with beads and pointed dowels (or knitting needles) makes changing the tie-up a breeze.

Can you imagine the dead end the friends and family of Jesus felt when they saw his body go limp on the cross? ……………………………………………………………………………………

Easter is about the excitement of knowing Someone who died and came back to life. In the Easter story, the angel tells the women who arrive at the tomb, “I know you seek Jesus, the Crucified. He is now Jesus, the Risen.” For these women, this moment changed everything. What had seemed like a dreadful dead end became the point of discovering new life. Indeed, even now, a dead end is often the starting point of finding new life in the Risen one.

May you discover something new.

Blessings,
Karen

4 Comments

  • Liberty says:

    Sometimes we just have to stop and think about something for a bit to find a different way!!
    Happy Easter!

  • linda says:

    Karen: I’ve had the same “not enough tredles problem” I had my husband make more tredles for the 8 harness Maycomber. I now have 14 tredles. He drilled more holes in the lambs for tie ups and away i go. I don’t use all of them all the time, but when I need them they’re there. They were added on the right and left so I could stay centered on the bench and the edges would behave.

    Hint: if you do not use a stretcherlike Karen and one edge is looking sloppy slide your butt just a smidge toward that side and the problem will correct itself. Weave on, linda

    • Karen says:

      Hi Linda,
      Steve may add treadles to this loom some day. So far, I rarely need more than six. I agree, it is nice to have them when you need them, though!

      Karen

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Secure with Hemstitching

Easter brings fun things to mind. Spring colors, decorated eggs, pretty dresses. Speaking of pretty dresses, in just one month I will wear my mother-of-the-bride dress, with this handwoven shawl on my shoulders. I am finishing the edge of the shawl with hemstitching on the loom. The hemstitching is decorative, but also has a practical purpose–it secures the warp ends and keeps the cloth from unraveling. If all goes as planned, twisted fringe will hang from the hem-stitched edge.

Hemstitching at the loom. Bamboo shawl.

Using a tapestry needle, every four warp ends are cinched together and connected with the two weft threads nearest the fell line.

Forgiveness, the truest demonstration of love, is the ultimate security. Do you see how forgiveness serves as a finishing edge that gives beauty and definition to real life? When you know you are forgiven, you are secure in knowing you are loved. To be forgiven–that’s the gift, the meaning, the wonder of Easter. This is love. God so loved the world that he offered forgiveness.

May your edges be beautifully finished.

Good Easter to you,
Karen

5 Comments

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