Handwoven Scarves Embellished with Flair

You could say I finished these scarves too late. Winter in Texas has come and gone. But I prefer to think of it as considerably early. When cool weather comes back around in a few months, I’ll be ready. I began with the draft for the lovely Stardust scarf, designed by Mona Nielsen, published in Happy Weaving, from VävMagasinet, p.74. I simply substituted the yarn and colors in the book with what I had on hand.

New warp on warping reel for winter scarves.
Warp is mostly 6/2 Tuna wool, with some 7.5/2 Brage wool included.
Stripes on the back beam. What a lovely sight!
Made with yarn on hand. This means that additional stripes have been added to the plan.
Weaving by the fire in the middle of winter.
Weaving by the fire in the middle of winter. Mora 20/2, a fine wool, is used for weft.
Two new wool scarves coming off the loom!
Two scarves coming off the loom.
Fringe twisting.
Fringes are cut and twisted.

The scarves are delightful, but the icing on the cake is the addition of fluffy, furry pompoms, an embellishment with youthful flair. And that is exactly what I will put on at the first sign of autumn chill.

Making pompoms to embellish the handwoven scarf.
Some of the thrums are used in making pompoms.
With the Pom and Tassel Maker by Red Heart I can make seven pompoms at a time.
With the Pom and Tassel Maker by Red Heart I can make seven pompoms at a time. I wrapped the yarn around 100 times, making full and thick pompoms.
Each furry ball is shaped and trimmed.
Each furry ball is shaped and trimmed. I used 8/2 cotton for the 12″ tie around the center of the pompoms.
Adding pompom embellishments to the scarf.
Each pompom is stitched to 3 – 4 twisted fringes. Seven pompoms at each end of the scarf.
Handwoven scarves with pompoms!
Now, the scarves are ready for wet finishing. Notice how you can see the separate strands of yarn in the pompoms before they are washed.
Handwoven scarves with pompoms, hanging to dry.
Scarves have been washed by hand in warm water in a large sink, with Eucalan delicate wash. I purposely gave them as much agitation as I could by hand. They are hanging to dry. Notice how the pompoms have slightly felted, making them even more soft and furry.
Winter scarf amid spring bluebonnets in Texas hill country.
Winter scarf amid spring bluebonnets in Texas hill country.

Some things are certain. The sun will rise tomorrow. The seasons will follow their schedule. The faithfulness of the Lord our God will never end.

May you dress in youthful flair.

Warmly,
Karen

22 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    Very pretty! I love the pompoms!

    Take care!!

  • Charlotte says:

    So, so, so precious! And! Your scarf is pretty special, as well!!!

  • Marianne says:

    It’s gorgeous! What a clever way to add Pom poms!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marianne, Thank you so much! The idea for the pompoms came from the book Happy Weaving. That’s what drew me to this scarf pattern.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Annie Lancaster says:

    Hi, Karen!

    I love the colors and pattern of this scarf. And the pom poms are the perfect touch. Thank you telling us how they were made and attached. I always learn from you.

    Please stay safe and healthy.

    Annie

  • Janet says:

    Love the addition of Pom Poms. I haven’t used tuna wool before but recently purchased many skeins for a throw. I know you’ve used quite often, what do you find the best sett for a lovely drape for a twill structure?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Janet, My favorite twill blanket from Tuna wool is the one I made at Vävstuga. You can see the info for the project here: Swedish Wool Blanket.
      Tuna wool is an excellent choice for a throw. I think you will enjoy weaving with it, too!

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Elisabeth says:

    What a beautiful and “happy” scarf I have never seen this pom pom maker before, a neat tool, thank you for showing us!
    Elisabeth

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, I happened upon the pompom maker while browsing at Hobby Lobby. I knew I wanted this embellishment for my scarves, so I was happy to find a helpful tool. It beats cutting out cardboard circles to wrap with yarn–one fluff ball at a time. It wouldn’t be hard to make a similar tool at home.

      I, too, think of this as a “happy” scarf.

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Betsy says:

    Such a fun scarf!

  • Nannette says:

    Hi Karen,
    What a pretty scarf. With the early Spring in Wisconsin, it is too warm to wear it here until November. More time for anticipation.

    My looms were taken to the retirement home Friday. The chipper was brought back so my sister can dispatch the 5 mature trees she dropped.

    Now I am going through my sewing room. Oh My, Why did I buy some of the things I am finding? Three piles. Donate, Sell, Take with me. Too many decisions. Where did I get all those cards of snaps from 1960?

    Are any of your readers in health care? I am wondering if the cloth face masks being shown as projects are something that can be used in the medical system, or are they just fashion statements? When the other grandchildren were born I would take a home made treat to leave with the nurses. This year I could leave some cheerful cloth masks…

    This latest grandson can come at any time.

    Blessings to all.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, Congratulations on your coming grandson. Life is full of twists and turns. I’m glad you have a place for looms in your new home. That gives you something to look forward to.

      Blessings to you,
      Karen

  • Betty Morrissey says:

    Beautiful! May I ask, when weaving with a stretchy wool warp, do you tension it tightly so the stretch is maxed out?
    The pom poms are a great use of ends. Thank you for your kindness, always.

    Betty

    • Karen says:

      Hi Betty, Great question! No, I don’t tension tightly to max out the stretch of the wool. I don’t want to over-stretch the wool. You have to find a happy medium so that it is tight enough that the shuttle doesn’t fall through, but not so tight that it will stretch the fibers out too far.

      I’m always happy when I can find a good use for some of the thrums. Who knows, maybe I’ll start putting pompoms on everything. 🙂

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Jan says:

    These are gorgeous. I am so inspired by your weaving and sharing.
    Thank you

  • Barbara Mitchell says:

    Love these scarves and the pom-poms. I tried to put pom-poms on a scarf, but couldn’t get them tightly enough tied on to the end of the twisted fringe so they just ended up looking goofy and wishy-washy, so I cut them off again. Do you have a secret?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Barbara, Thanks for asking! I think what helps is stitching the pom pom to a group of 3 or 4 twisted fringes, and the individual fringes are fairly thick. The tapestry needle with 8/2 cotton for the stitching thread goes through the fringes just above the knots and then through the center loop of the pom pom. I take the thread back around 3 or 4 times and then secure it with several small (hidden) stitches in the fringe/knot.

      Maybe you’ll have a chance to try it again. It does make a fun finishing for a scarf.

      All the best,
      Karen

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Process Review: Garden Rosepath Rag Rugs

A rosepath rag rug puts beauty under our toes. Strange? Yes, strangely wonderful. Let’s fill our homes with handmade goodies. Let’s make smiles happen in every corner. Let’s be different and make a difference. Live with beauty underfoot.

Three of these rugs have already gone to their new homes. (See Tied Up in Knots.) The remaining three rugs bring outdoor garden beauty indoors.

Rosepath rag rugs with a garden theme. Karen Isenhower
From bottom to top: Planting Seeds, Prayer Garden, Mystery Garden.

Come with me now to review the process of making these six rosepath rag rugs.

As Shelter in Place becomes a necessity for many, consider these words of encouragement from the book of Psalms: For He [the Lord] will conceal me in His shelter in the day of adversity. Psalm 27:5a

May you have smiles in every corner of your home.

Peace,
Karen

22 Comments

  • Beth Mullins says:

    They are beautiful!
    Be well, Karen!

  • Charlotte says:

    Ohhhhhhhhhhh my dearest! I so enjoyed your video! Thank you for sharing the journey accompanied with lovely music. You are dear and precious and it reflects in all you life and that which you create!

    Much love to you…so near and yet so far…Charlotte

  • Angela says:

    Absolutely beautiful rugs!! Such soothing music. I was wondering how wide your fabric strips were.

    Thank you.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Angela, I’m glad you like the rugs! The music is courtesy of Apple photos, where I create the slideshow.

      I cut my fabric strips 3/4″ (2cm). The hem area strips are half that size – 1cm. This is what I have found to be the norm in most of the Swedish rag rug books I’ve seen.

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Margaret Cook says:

    I am going to make a rosepath rag rug. I have linen for the warp and rug strips that I plan to do for some color in the rug. Can you share what sett was used for the rugs. And did you use s tabby in between each pattern weft? This is a new pattern for me and I want to get all the info right.
    Thank you for any help.
    Margaret

    • Karen says:

      Hi Margaret, Hooray for your rosepath rag rug endeavor!

      My sett is 8 epi for the rag rugs. Yes, I used tabby in between each pattern weft, except for one rug that was pattern only, with no tabby. I predict you will have a great time weaving your rug.

      Let me know if you have any more questions I can help you with. You can always reach me through the “Get in Touch” tab at the top of the webpage.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • D'Anne says:

    Your rugs are beautiful, Karen! Stay healthy and keep weaving.

  • marlene toerien says:

    Hi Karen please translate plattvav for me, when I googled it your name popped up with an example, it looks like monksbelt but I am not sure that is correct.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Marlene, You must be referring to plattväv towels that I made a while back. I don’t know about translating it, except I think platt means flat, so flat weave??

      I’m not an expert, except for my own limited experience with plattväv and monksbelt. They are very similar, both would be considered overshot weaves because they have pattern weft with tabby in between. Monksbelt usually has two pattern treadles, whereas plattväv has only one pattern treadle (at least in the plattväv I have woven.)

      I hope that helps.
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Lyna says:

    Another comforting passage is Psalm 91, especially verses 3-7. In uncertain times our Father God is our refuge and solid rock.
    God Bless!

  • Cynthia says:

    Beautiful. You and Steve stay safe I’m praying I don’t run out of thread for quilt making. I may try and call later in the week

  • Sandy says:

    Gorgeous! You’ve inspired me to think about making a few rag rugs for my new home.

    Stay safe and healthy in these troubling times.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Sandy, Thank you! I do hope it works out for you to make some rag rugs for your new home. It’s a wonderful way to personalize your space.

      Keep in health and blessings,
      Karen

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Tied Up in Knots

Every time you cut off a warp there is more to do before the woven material is ready for its end purpose. Do you enjoy tying knots? And, hemming rugs by hand? I don’t mind completing these final steps. It’s part of the whole weaving process. Three of the six rosepath rag rugs are now finished. Truly finished.

Six new rosepath rag rugs, ready for finishing!
Six rosepath rag rugs. Rugs are cut apart and warping-slat dividers have been removed.

Tying the warp ends in overhand knots permanently secures the weft. These knots won’t work loose. I turn the hem, concealing the knots; and stitch the hem down. After I sew on my label, the work is complete.

Tying knots to finish a rag rug.
Warp ends are tied into overhand knots, four ends at a time.
Rag rug finishing.
Ends are trimmed to 1 inch.
Hand hemming a rosepath rag rug.
Hem is folded under and pressed. The needle catches a warp end from the fold and a warp end from the body of the rug. Rug warp is used as thread for hemming.

Jesus famously said, “It is finished,” when he was on the cross. His completed good work replaces our work of trying to be good enough, trying to fix everything, trying to control our lives. Our knots won’t hold. We can trust that his finished work will never be undone. God loves you. Trusting him is loving him back.

Rosepath rag rug, fresh off the loom.
One completed rug, named “Treasures,” for my neighbor’s home.
Handwoven rag rugs, named "Blessed Assurance." Made for a friend.
Pair of completed rugs, named “Blessed Assurance,” for another neighbor’s home.

May love securely hold you.

Trusting,
Karen

12 Comments

  • Beth says:

    They are beautiful, Karen!
    I’m curious, do you wet finish the rugs before using them on the floor?

  • Charlotte says:

    Blessed assurance…Jesus is mine…oh what a foretaste of Glory divine…

    I adore your two rugs entitled “Blessed Assurance”…absolutely adore them!

    As you may be aware, Art Camp was cancelled. Now…the Bluebonnet Rally is cancelled. For 9 years…our April has been spent serving 250 people in Bandera. Goodness…we are quarantined and home. Now, I have this wonderful time before me to play in the studio. We need to talk!!!!!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Charlotte, The “Blessed Assurance” rugs are showstoppers, much to my surprise, since there is not a bit of blue in them. 🙂

      This is my story, this is my song. Our Lord is song-worthy all the day long.

      Love you,
      Karen

  • ellen b santana says:

    i heard in a sermon that the phrase it is finished in the original language was words used in commerce, to signify that the debt was paid. so cool.

  • Kristin G says:

    Such lovely rugs and words, Karen! I’m so glad I got to see one of them up close at the guild meeting – they really are beautiful. You made my heart smile with the ‘Blessed Assurance” named rugs. What a wonderful song to have playing in my mind today.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Kristin, I’m always happy when someone has a song in their heart. Glad to contribute to that!

      Your kind words are such an encouragement to me.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Elisabeth Munkvold says:

    What a beautiful bunch of rag rugs you have made!
    I am cutting rags at the moment…in between other textile projects 🙂
    We are so blessed to always have something to do, even more so now when staying home has become our new daily life. The healthcare system needs for as many of us as possible to do just that!! My mom has been on lockdown (in Norway) for a week already.
    Take care and stay healthy!
    Love, Elisabeth

    • Karen says:

      Hi Elisabeth, I’m glad to hear you have another rag rug project in the works. I agree, it is a blessing to have no shortage of things to do at home. It’s a good time to pray for our mothers, and those more vulnerable.

      Keep in health.
      Love,
      Karen

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Swedish Art Weaves with Joanne Hall

Krabbasnår (or Krabba), Rölakan, Halvkrabba, Dukagång, and Munkabälte (Monksbelt). These unique weaves have intrigued me since I first saw photos of them. Some of the designs look like hand-stitched embroidery. The Swedish Art Weaves workshop with Joanne Hall introduces the simple techniques used for weaving these traditional patterns. I’m thankful to have the opportunity to learn how to weave these beautiful designs for myself.

Swedish Art Weaves workshop with Joanne Hall.
Joanne brought examples of Swedish art weaves for the students to view.

Joanne’s presentation to the San Antonio Handweavers Guild was enlightening. Photos of her travels to Sweden show how the rich weaving heritage there continues to thrive. That, along with Joanne’s knowledge of Swedish weaving traditions, gives context to these Swedish art weaves.

Krabbasnår, a Swedish art weave.
Krabbasnår (krabba) is a laid-in technique with a plain weave ground. The pattern uses three strands of wool Fårö yarn. The warp is 16/3 linen.
Weaving Krabba, a Swedish art weave.
Besides maintaining warp width, the temple is useful for covering up the weft tails to keep them out of the way.
Workshop with Joanne Hall. Swedish Art Weaves.
Joanne explains the next step to workshop participants.
Swedish Art Weaves sampler, with Joanne Hall.
Dukagång is another laid-in technique with a plain weave ground. A batten is placed behind the shafts to make it easy to have the pattern wefts cover two warp threads. (A jack loom can do the same by using half-heddle sticks in front of the shafts.) Dukagång can be woven as a threaded pattern, but then the weaver is limited to that one structure, instead of having different patterns all in the same woven piece.
Fascinating way to weave monksbelt!
With threaded monksbelt, as I have woven previously, the monksbelt flowers are in a fixed position. With this art weaves monksbelt, the monksbelt flowers can be placed wherever you want them. Half-heddle sticks at the back, batten behind the shafts, and a pick-up stick in front of the reed–a fascinating way to weave this traditional pattern.
Swedish Art Weaves workshop with Joanne Hall. So much fun!
Last loom standing… Time to pack up. As I prepare the loom for transport, I detach the cloth beam cords. Now we can see the right side of what I have woven.
Swedish Art Weaves with Joanne Hall. Fun!
From the top: Krabbasnår, Rölakan Tapestry, Halvkrabba, Dukagång, and Munkabälte.

Väv 2/2013 has instructions for the art weaves. I have the magazine issue, but Joanne’s workshop brings the historical techniques to life and makes them understandable. That is exactly the prompting I needed to begin exploring these fascinating patterns on my own loom.

Weaving Swedish art weaves from the back.
Back at home, my little loom is getting ready to weave some more beautiful Swedish art weave designs.

May something historical be your new interest.

Happy Weaving,
Karen

19 Comments

  • Beth says:

    Beautiful! I’m curious, how long did it take to weave this piece?

    • Karen says:

      Hi Beth,

      As with most weft-faced weaves, this is not fast weaving. I was happy to be able to finish this much in a 2 1/2-day workshop. I’m eager to do more of this slower-paced weaving at home.

      Thanks,
      Karen

  • Charlotte says:

    Brilliant that you were able to take your loom…your beautiful loom…your piece is absolutely lovely. The colors in your top match the colors in your cloth. Fun!!!! And, lovely cloth!!!!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Charlotte,

      I’m fortunate to have a countermarch loom small enough to be dismantled and relocated. It was a satisfying workshop. So enjoyable to make these unique patterns in the cloth!

      Thank you,
      Karen

  • Vivian says:

    Your explanation is bright and helpful. I will shelve these weaving methods. I have been interested in the weaves and you have helped untangle the concepts as well as highlight the various groups of Swedish weave structures.

  • Cindie says:

    How timely, I’ve just written my deposit check this morning for a guild workshop we’ll be having with Joanne this coming fall.

  • Jane Milner says:

    I recently took the same class with Joanne Hall at the Eugene Textile Center in Eugene, Oregon. Lots of fun, and I learned a lot!

    Is your small loom a Glimakra? What is it?

  • Anonymous says:

    I just got myself a 32 in Heddle. I’d like to make small Matt’s and runners. I live in Chilliwack B.C. Can you direct me to a class?

    • Karen says:

      Hi new weaver, I am not connected with any rigid heddle loom classes. There are some good books on rigid heddle weaving. A book by Syne Mitchell, Liz Gipson, or Jane Patrick would be a great place to start.

      All the best,
      Karen

  • Ladella Williams says:

    Ladella from Portland Oregon actually knows Joanne Hall! Also she went to college with my cousin! I highly recommend her as a weaver with considerable experience! She has a wealth of knowledge and experience! Happy Weaving! I have been weaving forever it seems!

    • Karen says:

      Hi Ladella, How wonderful that you have a personal connection with Joanne. Her weaving knowledge and experience can’t be matched. What I love about Joanne is her kind and gentle manner as she patiently passes on her knowledge to her students.

      Thank you for chiming in!
      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Arlene says:

    Facinating.. can you suggest a book but I could follow the technique …thanks in advance Arlene

    • Karen says:

      Hi Arlene, Yes, I recommend Heirlooms of Skåne: Weaving Techniques, by Gunvor Johansson. Vavstuga.com carries the book. The author covers all these techniques in detail. It’s a beautiful book.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • […] Joanne Hall’s Swedish Art Weaves workshop that I took a few months ago? With the warp that was left, I explored some of the art weaves in […]

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Happy Ending Rag Rug Warp

Welcome to my weaving studio, which doubles as our home, I said, as they walked up to the front door. Our luncheon guests were introduced to the weaving environment of the Texas hill country home that Steve and I enjoy. Our time together was refreshing, filled with lively conversation over a home-cooked meal, complete with discussions about looms, threads, and like-minded pleasures.

Lunch with honored guest, Joanne Hall.
Steve and I enjoy lunch with honored guest, Joanne Hall, and a few members of the San Antonio Handweavers Guild.
Karen, Janis, Joanne Hall, Henriette, Vesna, and Cindy.

Six rosepath rag rugs encompass the cloth beam, with the back tie-on bar just inches behind the heddles. It seems only fitting that the woman who gave me my first rosepath rag-weaving experience should be given the cherished scissors for this momentous occasion. Joanne, will you do us the honor of cutting off? I couldn’t have wished for a happier ending of this warp.

Joanne Hall does the honor of cutting off the rag rugs.
Joanne Hall, ready to cut off the rag rugs.
Cutting off rag rugs.
Cutting off.
Unrolling the cloth beam with new rosepath rag rugs.
Unrolling rugs from the cloth beam.
Six new rosepath rag rugs, ready for finishing.
Six new rosepath rag rugs, ready for finishing.

We all have wishes, some of which we make public, and some remain as closely-held secrets. It’s those deep wishes that make us who we are. God knows your name. He knows your deep desires. One day, all our secret wishes will be rolled out like a stretch of rag rugs for the Maker to examine. Amazingly, he offers grace to cover the wrongs. And He embroiders his Name on the hand-crafted souls that belong to him.

May your cloth beam keep filling up with deep-hearted wishes.

Your friend,
Karen

6 Comments

  • Geri Rickard says:

    Just beautiful, and your weaving studio/home is lovely! What fun having Joanne there!

  • Janis Schiller says:

    Thank you to you and Steve for a splendid day in the Hill country. And your rugs are lovely (as are so many other pieces in your home ). You have a great eye for putting colors together.

    • Karen says:

      Hi Janis, We sure enjoyed having you. I appreciate your kind compliments. I do get a thrill from putting colors together.

      Happy weaving,
      Karen

  • Nannette says:

    Straight selvages. Even rows. Woven hems with a little ripple to compensate for the shrinkage. And, oh the colors!!! Combinations that pull me in to take a closer look. Beautiful.

    My husband is now t-minus 10 months to retirement. My floor loom is dismantled. Pieces leaning against the wall in a space 2Xs what the warping board takes. A couple milk crates of warp. Two airtight totes holding my books and supplies collected over the decades.

    Not much considering all the beauty such a small space can and has created.

    I am staying put for the next month. Grandbaby #3 is going to meet us by April 3rd.

    Until then… Your wonderful posts will feed my weaving creativity.

    Thank You

    • Karen says:

      Hi Nannette, Step by step, things come back together again. Enjoy the process. And congratulations on the coming new family member.

      All the best,
      Karen

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